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New York City - Rain - Greenwich Village.

"The decisive moment" is a defining phrase associated with Henri Cartier-Bresson, the father of modern photojournalism. It is a phrase that has influenced countless photographers over the years and sparked endless debate and theory.

When I first started taking photos of New York City, I knew very little about the history of photography. The movement of the city’s… continue reading here… 

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This is my weekly blog post to the PDN site over in the  PDN Emerging Photographer’s section.

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Enjoy! 

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View “Rain - New York City - Greenwich Village - Washington Square”  in my photography portfolio here, email me, or ask for help.

New York City - Rain - Greenwich Village.

"The decisive moment" is a defining phrase associated with Henri Cartier-Bresson, the father of modern photojournalism. It is a phrase that has influenced countless photographers over the years and sparked endless debate and theory.

When I first started taking photos of New York City, I knew very little about the history of photography. The movement of the city’s… continue reading here…

—-

This is my weekly blog post to the PDN site over in the PDN Emerging Photographer’s section.

—-

Enjoy!

—-

View “Rain - New York City - Greenwich Village - Washington Square” in my photography portfolio here, email me, or ask for help.

Rain. New York City. Greenwich Village.

When the sky opens up over the city, urban wanderers glide over the surface of streets slick with shadowy memory.

And every drop of rain holds the world in its slippery grasp.

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Recently, someone who saw this same photo in black and white inquired if I also had the image available in color. Since I shoot in color and convert my color photos to black and white after the fact (with a few exceptions), I went through my library and found my color rendition of this scene. I was struck with how the photo evoked a different set of emotions when viewing it in color. I have come to love it in black and white to such an extent that my memory of the scene as it occurred also plays out in my mind in black and white. However, I remember the initial appeal of this candid moment was the strong bursts of color against the winter-bare trees. The day was bitterly cold: the type of damp cold that seeps down to the bone and in one short moment, the street erupted with color. It was such a fleeting moment but it created such a spark. 

On a related note, I read an interesting essay by Joel Meyerwitz a few days ago on the New York Times Lens Blog called A Question of Colors - Answered. Meyerwitz is part of a current exhibition in London which compares some of Henri Cartier-Bresson’s black and white images with work by other noted photographers who have been influenced by him but have chosen to work in color for a large part of their photography careers. The curator of this particular exhibition states that: “This exhibition will show how Henri Cartier-Bresson, in spite of his skeptical attitude regarding the artistic value of colour photography, nevertheless exerted a powerful influence over photographers who took up the new medium and who were determined to put a personal stamp on it. In effect, his criticisms of colour spurred on a new generation, determined to overcome the obstacles and prove him wrong.” 

It’s interesting to me that color photography inhabits a more defensive realm than black and white photography especially when it comes to street photography. I think that both have different psychological effects on the viewer and both can be just as valid in terms of having artistic value. However, it’s definitely not a simple debate. 

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View this photo larger and on black on my Google Plus page

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Buy “Rain - New York City - Greenwich Village - Washington Square” Posters and Prints here, View my store, email me, or ask for help.

Rain. New York City. Greenwich Village.

When the sky opens up over the city, urban wanderers glide over the surface of streets slick with shadowy memory.

And every drop of rain holds the world in its slippery grasp.

—-

Recently, someone who saw this same photo in black and white inquired if I also had the image available in color. Since I shoot in color and convert my color photos to black and white after the fact (with a few exceptions), I went through my library and found my color rendition of this scene. I was struck with how the photo evoked a different set of emotions when viewing it in color. I have come to love it in black and white to such an extent that my memory of the scene as it occurred also plays out in my mind in black and white. However, I remember the initial appeal of this candid moment was the strong bursts of color against the winter-bare trees. The day was bitterly cold: the type of damp cold that seeps down to the bone and in one short moment, the street erupted with color. It was such a fleeting moment but it created such a spark.

On a related note, I read an interesting essay by Joel Meyerwitz a few days ago on the New York Times Lens Blog called A Question of Colors - Answered. Meyerwitz is part of a current exhibition in London which compares some of Henri Cartier-Bresson’s black and white images with work by other noted photographers who have been influenced by him but have chosen to work in color for a large part of their photography careers. The curator of this particular exhibition states that: “This exhibition will show how Henri Cartier-Bresson, in spite of his skeptical attitude regarding the artistic value of colour photography, nevertheless exerted a powerful influence over photographers who took up the new medium and who were determined to put a personal stamp on it. In effect, his criticisms of colour spurred on a new generation, determined to overcome the obstacles and prove him wrong.”

It’s interesting to me that color photography inhabits a more defensive realm than black and white photography especially when it comes to street photography. I think that both have different psychological effects on the viewer and both can be just as valid in terms of having artistic value. However, it’s definitely not a simple debate.

—-

View this photo larger and on black on my Google Plus page

—-

Buy “Rain - New York City - Greenwich Village - Washington Square” Posters and Prints here, View my store, email me, or ask for help.

Rain. Greenwich Village, New York City.

Rain is the sky’s love song to the city.

The sky opens up revealing an other-worldly light that cloaks the city in effervescent splendor. 

Sidewalks and streets, slick with promise, mirror the movement of urban explorers navigating the sleek concrete as taxi lights shine their refracted, blurred lights into the vast expanse of the rain-soaked landscape.


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Sharing this photo today since I talked about it (briefly) and a few other photos of mine on Trey Ratcliff's Stuck in Customs Show last night. Trey was traveling and I was asked last minute if I would be on the show with a few other street photographers to discuss some of our work. It was a great time! The other photographers on the show were Eric Kim and Rinzi Ruiz and it was hosted by Karen Hutton and Dave Veffer. I am already a huge fan of Eric’s street photography but I wasn’t familiar with Rinzi’s work and it completely blew me away. 

While the majority of my work tends to focus on New York City’s landscapes and architecture and is devoid of people, it was nice to discuss a few of my photos that do have people in them and talk a little bit about my philosophy on shooting people in the city and the narratives I tend to gravitate towards when dealing with people shots.

 It’s always interesting to see how certain themes emerge with any art form and I seem to have a fondness for street photography in the rain. I blame New York City for that fondness. It’s just so incredibly moody and beautiful when it rains here :). 

You can view the show from last night here: Trey’s Variety Hour #53: Street Photography

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View this photo larger and on black on my Google Plus page

—-

Buy “Rain - Greenwich Village - New York City” Prints here, email me, or ask for help.

Rain. Greenwich Village, New York City.

Rain is the sky’s love song to the city.

The sky opens up revealing an other-worldly light that cloaks the city in effervescent splendor.

Sidewalks and streets, slick with promise, mirror the movement of urban explorers navigating the sleek concrete as taxi lights shine their refracted, blurred lights into the vast expanse of the rain-soaked landscape.

—-

Sharing this photo today since I talked about it (briefly) and a few other photos of mine on Trey Ratcliff's Stuck in Customs Show last night. Trey was traveling and I was asked last minute if I would be on the show with a few other street photographers to discuss some of our work. It was a great time! The other photographers on the show were Eric Kim and Rinzi Ruiz and it was hosted by Karen Hutton and Dave Veffer. I am already a huge fan of Eric’s street photography but I wasn’t familiar with Rinzi’s work and it completely blew me away.

While the majority of my work tends to focus on New York City’s landscapes and architecture and is devoid of people, it was nice to discuss a few of my photos that do have people in them and talk a little bit about my philosophy on shooting people in the city and the narratives I tend to gravitate towards when dealing with people shots.

It’s always interesting to see how certain themes emerge with any art form and I seem to have a fondness for street photography in the rain. I blame New York City for that fondness. It’s just so incredibly moody and beautiful when it rains here :).

You can view the show from last night here: Trey’s Variety Hour #53: Street Photography

—-

View this photo larger and on black on my Google Plus page

—-

Buy “Rain - Greenwich Village - New York City” Prints here, email me, or ask for help.

Rain in Greenwich Village, New York City.

In dreams memories take on the hues of nostalgia: faded hues made rich with meaning that are etched into the dreamscapes that play themselves against our eyelids each night.

Memory-tones diffused by the tear-in-the eye and lump-in-the throat feeling of familiarity synthesize with overwhelming feelings of connection with the past as it dilutes itself into the present. 


—-

View this photo larger and on black on my Google Plus page

—-

Buy “The Color of Rain - Greenwich Village - New York City” Posters and Prints here, email me, or ask for help.

Rain in Greenwich Village, New York City.

In dreams memories take on the hues of nostalgia: faded hues made rich with meaning that are etched into the dreamscapes that play themselves against our eyelids each night.

Memory-tones diffused by the tear-in-the eye and lump-in-the throat feeling of familiarity synthesize with overwhelming feelings of connection with the past as it dilutes itself into the present.

—-

View this photo larger and on black on my Google Plus page

—-

Buy “The Color of Rain - Greenwich Village - New York City” Posters and Prints here, email me, or ask for help.