NY Through the Lens - New York City Photography

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Flatiron Building sunset. Autumn. Madison Square Park. New York City.

Late autumn in New York City has its own brisk beauty. Cold air sharply punctuates the end of every wind gust and the sun retreats earlier and earlier every day. Autumn clings to December in the brief moments before the trees drop their leaves to the ground for good and every afternoon sunset reaches through the sharp cold with its lighted fingers in one last dramatic attempt to bring warmth to the city. 

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This particular view is of the Flatiron Building, one of New York City’s unique and classic skyscrapers, as seen from inside Madison Square Park during autumn. 


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Buy “Flatiron Building Sunset - Autumn - New York City” Prints here, email me, or ask for help.

Flatiron Building sunset. Autumn. Madison Square Park. New York City.

Late autumn in New York City has its own brisk beauty. Cold air sharply punctuates the end of every wind gust and the sun retreats earlier and earlier every day. Autumn clings to December in the brief moments before the trees drop their leaves to the ground for good and every afternoon sunset reaches through the sharp cold with its lighted fingers in one last dramatic attempt to bring warmth to the city.

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This particular view is of the Flatiron Building, one of New York City’s unique and classic skyscrapers, as seen from inside Madison Square Park during autumn.

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View this photo larger and on black on my Google Plus page

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Buy “Flatiron Building Sunset - Autumn - New York City” Prints here, email me, or ask for help.

The Chrysler Building and New York City skyline.

This is a favorite view of the Chrysler Building. In truth, the Chrysler Building is my favorite skyscraper in New York City. I have always loved the art-deco architecture of it’s spire and how its needle pokes out above the other skyscrapers that populate the New York City skyline in midtown Manhattan. 

This particular view is looking west towards Manhattan and sitting in the foreground are the skyscrapers of Tudor City: neo-gothic historic buildings that lay their claim to fame for being part of the first residential skyscraper complex in the entire world. 


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View this photo larger and on black on my Google Plus page

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Buy “The Chrysler Building and New York City Skyline” Prints here, email me, or ask for help.

The Chrysler Building and New York City skyline.

This is a favorite view of the Chrysler Building. In truth, the Chrysler Building is my favorite skyscraper in New York City. I have always loved the art-deco architecture of it’s spire and how its needle pokes out above the other skyscrapers that populate the New York City skyline in midtown Manhattan.

This particular view is looking west towards Manhattan and sitting in the foreground are the skyscrapers of Tudor City: neo-gothic historic buildings that lay their claim to fame for being part of the first residential skyscraper complex in the entire world.

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View this photo larger and on black on my Google Plus page

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Buy “The Chrysler Building and New York City Skyline” Prints here, email me, or ask for help.

The Flatiron Building and Fifth Avenue Building Clock. Midtown.

I have always loved the ornate clocks that line 5th Avenue, especially the Fifth Avenue Building Block that has a prime destination near the Flatiron Building. At 19 feet high, the cast-iron clock was installed in 1909 and was crafted by a Brooklyn Iron Works company. It’s a type of clock that was introduced in the 1860s. They were popular with business owners who wanted to attract extra attention and also served a functional purpose as time-telling pieces in a busy area of Manhattan.

The juxtaposition between the Flatiron Building, one of New York City’s iconic skyscrapers and this cast-iron clock has always put a smile on my face. The Flatiron Building, which was completed in 1902 is also a landmark in Manhattan. Its name is in reference to its resemblance to a cast-iron clothes iron. 


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View this photo larger and on black on my Google Plus page

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Buy “Flatiron Building and 5th Avenue Building Clock - New York City” Prints here, email me, or ask for help.

The Flatiron Building and Fifth Avenue Building Clock. Midtown.

I have always loved the ornate clocks that line 5th Avenue, especially the Fifth Avenue Building Block that has a prime destination near the Flatiron Building. At 19 feet high, the cast-iron clock was installed in 1909 and was crafted by a Brooklyn Iron Works company. It’s a type of clock that was introduced in the 1860s. They were popular with business owners who wanted to attract extra attention and also served a functional purpose as time-telling pieces in a busy area of Manhattan.

The juxtaposition between the Flatiron Building, one of New York City’s iconic skyscrapers and this cast-iron clock has always put a smile on my face. The Flatiron Building, which was completed in 1902 is also a landmark in Manhattan. Its name is in reference to its resemblance to a cast-iron clothes iron.

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View this photo larger and on black on my Google Plus page

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Buy “Flatiron Building and 5th Avenue Building Clock - New York City” Prints here, email me, or ask for help.

Manhattanhenge overlooking 42nd Street and Tudor City Overpass. New York City. 

This was taken during last year’s Manhattanhenge sunset.The experience was rather intense. Even though I got to the overpass an hour and a half before sunset, I was told that many photographers had set up their equipment as early as 3 pm. When the sun started its very dramatic descent all that could be heard was the sound of cameras clicking away. It’s definitely a phenomenon I don’t plan to ever skip now that I have experienced it. 

While the sun’s dramatic dip only lasts for a few minutes, it’s enough to take one’s breath away for the entire duration. The city is bathed in the light from the sun and the most beautiful red glow is cast through the streets. 

Manhattanhenge is a semiannual occurrence in which the setting sun aligns with the east–west streets of the main street grid in the borough of Manhattan in New York City. The term is derived from Stonehenge, at which the sun aligns with the stones on the solstices. It was coined in 2002 by Neil deGrasse Tyson, an astrophysicist who is the director of the Hayden Planetarium at the American Museum of Natural History.


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View this photo larger and on black on my Google Plus page


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Buy “Manhattanhenge, 42nd Street and Tudor City Place Overpass, Midtown New York City” Prints here, email me, or ask for help.

Manhattanhenge overlooking 42nd Street and Tudor City Overpass. New York City.

This was taken during last year’s Manhattanhenge sunset.The experience was rather intense. Even though I got to the overpass an hour and a half before sunset, I was told that many photographers had set up their equipment as early as 3 pm. When the sun started its very dramatic descent all that could be heard was the sound of cameras clicking away. It’s definitely a phenomenon I don’t plan to ever skip now that I have experienced it.

While the sun’s dramatic dip only lasts for a few minutes, it’s enough to take one’s breath away for the entire duration. The city is bathed in the light from the sun and the most beautiful red glow is cast through the streets.

Manhattanhenge is a semiannual occurrence in which the setting sun aligns with the east–west streets of the main street grid in the borough of Manhattan in New York City. The term is derived from Stonehenge, at which the sun aligns with the stones on the solstices. It was coined in 2002 by Neil deGrasse Tyson, an astrophysicist who is the director of the Hayden Planetarium at the American Museum of Natural History.

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View this photo larger and on black on my Google Plus page

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Buy “Manhattanhenge, 42nd Street and Tudor City Place Overpass, Midtown New York City” Prints here, email me, or ask for help.