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New York rain. Romance on Doyers Street. Chinatown.Stolen moments are the sweetest moments. When the rest of the city has escaped for the day, the world melts away with a lingering kiss under an umbrella.
—-It’s really no secret that Doyers Street is one of my favorite streets in lower Manhattan. It’s an alley (or very narrow street) that is usually photographed from an entirely different angle. In fact, the fact that it has a sharp angle in it goes along with its colorful history. Its angle was known as “the Bloody Angle” for part of the 20th century due to gang violence.This is just around the bend from the more popular part of the angle and also across from one of my favorite noodle shops in Chinatown. I love moments like this that are so completely candid but somehow feel cinematic. I had just walked out from the above-mentioned noodle shop when I was met with this scene. It was too perfect to not quickly capture, of course.To all who celebrate Valentine’s Day and to all who do not celebrate - I wish you romantic moments like this one. ♥—-Taken with the Sony A55.

—-View this photo with a comment thread on my Google Plus page—-Buy “Stolen Moments - Chinatown - New York City” Posters and Prints here, email me, or ask for help.

New York rain. Romance on Doyers Street. Chinatown.


Stolen moments are the sweetest moments.


When the rest of the city has escaped for the day, the world melts away with a lingering kiss under an umbrella.


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It’s really no secret that Doyers Street is one of my favorite streets in lower Manhattan. It’s an alley (or very narrow street) that is usually photographed from an entirely different angle. In fact, the fact that it has a sharp angle in it goes along with its colorful history. Its angle was known as “the Bloody Angle” for part of the 20th century due to gang violence.


This is just around the bend from the more popular part of the angle and also across from one of my favorite noodle shops in Chinatown. I love moments like this that are so completely candid but somehow feel cinematic. I had just walked out from the above-mentioned noodle shop when I was met with this scene. It was too perfect to not quickly capture, of course.


To all who celebrate Valentine’s Day and to all who do not celebrate - I wish you romantic moments like this one. ♥


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Taken with the Sony A55.

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View this photo with a comment thread on my Google Plus page


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Buy “Stolen Moments - Chinatown - New York City” Posters and Prints here, email me, or ask for help.

Cherry blossom trees in full bloom. Brooklyn, New York City.

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When no one is looking, the trees dance.

With their limbs outstretched and their blossoms blush-pink and white in the heat of the sun’s glow, they whirl gracefully with each and every pirouette.

And the wind hold their limbs close to its heart twirling them around whispering utterances of love on every warm breeze.

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View this photo larger and on black on my Google Plus page

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Buy “Dance of the Trees - Cherry Blossoms - New York City” Prints here, email me, or ask for help.

Cherry blossom trees in full bloom. Brooklyn, New York City.

—-

When no one is looking, the trees dance.

With their limbs outstretched and their blossoms blush-pink and white in the heat of the sun’s glow, they whirl gracefully with each and every pirouette.

And the wind hold their limbs close to its heart twirling them around whispering utterances of love on every warm breeze.

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View this photo larger and on black on my Google Plus page

—-

Buy “Dance of the Trees - Cherry Blossoms - New York City” Prints here, email me, or ask for help.

Washington Mews on a cloudy day. Greenwich Village, New York City.

There are streets that I revisit with regularity. These streets seem to call me back again and again. Tucked away and nearly hidden, they are treasure chests that open to reveal a wealth of warm, new feelings with every passing season. I used to come to this particular street quite a bit but it wasn’t until a year or so ago that I learned about its history.

The street sits on land that in the 18th century was part of a large farm that contained private stables used by the families of men such as nineteenth century architect Richard Morris Hunt, John Taylor Johnston who was the founding president of the Metropolitan Museum of Art , and Pierre Lorillard who was a prominent American tobacco manufacturer.

In the first half of the 20th century, a community of about 200 painters and sculptors flourished on this particular street and another adjoining street in the area. In 1903, a reporter for the New York Tribune wrote: “One finds a strange mixture of bales of hay and enormous blocks of marble, boxes of plaster and barrels of oats littering the roadways. Truckmen in greasy jumpers touch elbows now and then with the sculptors in their clay spattered working garb.”

One of the more prominent artists who had a studio on this beautiful street was Edward Hopper. Edward Hopper lived close to Washington Mews at 3 Washington Square starting in December 1913 until his death in 1967.

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View this photo larger and on black on my Google Plus page

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Buy “Washington Mews - Greenwich Village - New York City” Prints here, email me, or ask for help.

Washington Mews on a cloudy day. Greenwich Village, New York City.

There are streets that I revisit with regularity. These streets seem to call me back again and again. Tucked away and nearly hidden, they are treasure chests that open to reveal a wealth of warm, new feelings with every passing season. I used to come to this particular street quite a bit but it wasn’t until a year or so ago that I learned about its history.

The street sits on land that in the 18th century was part of a large farm that contained private stables used by the families of men such as nineteenth century architect Richard Morris Hunt, John Taylor Johnston who was the founding president of the Metropolitan Museum of Art , and Pierre Lorillard who was a prominent American tobacco manufacturer.

In the first half of the 20th century, a community of about 200 painters and sculptors flourished on this particular street and another adjoining street in the area. In 1903, a reporter for the New York Tribune wrote: “One finds a strange mixture of bales of hay and enormous blocks of marble, boxes of plaster and barrels of oats littering the roadways. Truckmen in greasy jumpers touch elbows now and then with the sculptors in their clay spattered working garb.”

One of the more prominent artists who had a studio on this beautiful street was Edward Hopper. Edward Hopper lived close to Washington Mews at 3 Washington Square starting in December 1913 until his death in 1967.

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View this photo larger and on black on my Google Plus page

—-

Buy “Washington Mews - Greenwich Village - New York City” Prints here, email me, or ask for help.

Row boats and willow trees at The Lake in Central Park. New York City.

When the summer sun has drifted low into the sky after every bit of earth has been soaked in its warm splendor, the trees hang their heads down in mournful remembrance of winter’s impending icy touch.

And the willows play a slow and deliberate adagio to accompany the last of summer’s lovers on the sweetest sun-kissed wings of the wind.

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View this photo larger and on black on my Google Plus page

—-

Buy “Song of the Willows - The Lake - Central Park - New York City” Prints here, email me, or ask for help.

Row boats and willow trees at The Lake in Central Park. New York City.

When the summer sun has drifted low into the sky after every bit of earth has been soaked in its warm splendor, the trees hang their heads down in mournful remembrance of winter’s impending icy touch.

And the willows play a slow and deliberate adagio to accompany the last of summer’s lovers on the sweetest sun-kissed wings of the wind.

—-

View this photo larger and on black on my Google Plus page

—-

Buy “Song of the Willows - The Lake - Central Park - New York City” Prints here, email me, or ask for help.