NY Through the Lens - New York City Photography

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Stone Street Historic District. South William Street. Financial District - New York City.

Something I absolutely love about New York City is that tucked away between the towering monuments of modernity that populate the cityscape are streets that look as if they have been transported from another era and geographic location entirely. These streets are suspended in time like flies in amber.

This area is known as the Stone Street historic district in lower Manhattan. Bound by Stone Street, Pearl Street, and South William Streets and Mill Lane, it is a section that is unlike any of its surrounding blocks. This particular section is bound by South William street and 13-15 South William Street can be seen in this particular view. Around the block from this part of the area are other historic buildings and the Stone Street area ‘proper’.

In 1903, the architect C.P.H. Gilbert designed new street facades on the buildings in this section of South William Street (57 Stone Street on the other side). Gilbert’s neo-Dutch Renaissance architecture features structural details like stepped gables and strapwork and was a nod to the early settlement of Manhattan.

This area which dates back to the 1600s when New York City was first colonized by Dutch settlers was sadly destroyed by the Great Fire of 1835. The surrounding section of Stone Street was rebuilt with granite bases of post-and-lintel construction and upper-additions of brick which were specifically erected for importers and merchants.

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Buy “Stone Street Historic District - Financial District - New York City” Posters and Prints here, email me, or ask for help.

Stone Street Historic District. South William Street. Financial District - New York City.

Something I absolutely love about New York City is that tucked away between the towering monuments of modernity that populate the cityscape are streets that look as if they have been transported from another era and geographic location entirely. These streets are suspended in time like flies in amber.

This area is known as the Stone Street historic district in lower Manhattan. Bound by Stone Street, Pearl Street, and South William Streets and Mill Lane, it is a section that is unlike any of its surrounding blocks. This particular section is bound by South William street and 13-15 South William Street can be seen in this particular view. Around the block from this part of the area are other historic buildings and the Stone Street area ‘proper’.

In 1903, the architect C.P.H. Gilbert designed new street facades on the buildings in this section of South William Street (57 Stone Street on the other side). Gilbert’s neo-Dutch Renaissance architecture features structural details like stepped gables and strapwork and was a nod to the early settlement of Manhattan.

This area which dates back to the 1600s when New York City was first colonized by Dutch settlers was sadly destroyed by the Great Fire of 1835. The surrounding section of Stone Street was rebuilt with granite bases of post-and-lintel construction and upper-additions of brick which were specifically erected for importers and merchants.

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View this photo larger and on black on my Google Plus page

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Buy “Stone Street Historic District - Financial District - New York City” Posters and Prints here, email me, or ask for help.

The Chrysler Building as seen from 42nd Street. Midtown, New York City.


There is a fun ongoing project on Google Plus called Artistic Google. I found out about it earlier this week and fell head over heels in love with it. Each week revolves around a specific city. To participate you use Google Maps to seek out favorite locations or explore the selected city by foot using Street View and when you come across something you want to creatively process, you screenshot the Google Maps Street View image (the raw untouched one) and then you process it any way you want and share it by using the hashtag I used in the beginning of the post.

This week’s city is New York City. How could I pass that up? :)

This screenshot (directly from Google Street View!) is of one of my favorite views of the Chrysler Building. I decided to go for an old film type of processing because this part of New York City (for me anyway) evokes the mid twentieth century. The tones remind me of the blank newsprint my father used to bring home for me and my brothers to use as scrap paper (he was a newspaper pressman). I loved using that paper for drawing and writing. 


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View this photo larger and on black on my Google Plus page 

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View my store, email me, or ask for help.

The Chrysler Building as seen from 42nd Street. Midtown, New York City.

There is a fun ongoing project on Google Plus called Artistic Google. I found out about it earlier this week and fell head over heels in love with it. Each week revolves around a specific city. To participate you use Google Maps to seek out favorite locations or explore the selected city by foot using Street View and when you come across something you want to creatively process, you screenshot the Google Maps Street View image (the raw untouched one) and then you process it any way you want and share it by using the hashtag I used in the beginning of the post.

This week’s city is New York City. How could I pass that up? :)

This screenshot (directly from Google Street View!) is of one of my favorite views of the Chrysler Building. I decided to go for an old film type of processing because this part of New York City (for me anyway) evokes the mid twentieth century. The tones remind me of the blank newsprint my father used to bring home for me and my brothers to use as scrap paper (he was a newspaper pressman). I loved using that paper for drawing and writing.

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View this photo larger and on black on my Google Plus page

—-

View my store, email me, or ask for help.

Urban decay. Chinatown, New York City.

New York City changes and evolves at a rapid pace. In certain areas, changes occur faster than others. Lower Manhattan is one place that has changed the most in the last decade. Development happens fast and the current trends are extremely tall buildings constructed mostly of glass, chain stores and luxury boutiques. In neighborhoods that were once bohemian and home to artists and rebels, these current changes have been hard to swallow for long-time residents who run the risk of being out-priced out of the neighborhoods they have called home for decades.

Despite these changes, there are still parts of lower Manhattan that recall earlier decades. New York City suffered economically in the 1970s and it was during this decade that much of lower Manhattan was transformed into a danger zone full of abandoned lots and buildings and rampant crime. Having grown up in New York City in the 1980s and early 1990s, I have vivid memories of riding graffiti-covered trains from Queens into Manhattan. I was taught to ‘watch my back’ at all times since everyone seemed to know someone who had been mugged. Things were still different in those days prior to the initiatives by mayors Koch and Guiliani to ‘clean up’ the city (and discourse is still rampant regarding how they handled it). 

When I came across this section of Canal Street while walking home from getting groceries a few months back, my heart almost leaped out of my chest. Here I was staring at a section of a spot in Chinatown that seemed as if it had been dipped in 1980s New York City and had become frozen in time (thankfully I had my camera). It’s hard to put into words how powerful this scene is for personally. It’s a bit like staring at something that once existed in a distant life. 

A city may change rapidly discarding pieces of itself, but it’s the people who carry it’s broken pieces with them in their hearts who imbue the city with its memory. 


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View this photo larger and on black on my Google Plus page

—-

Buy “Decay” Posters and Prints here, View my store, email me, or ask for help.

Urban decay. Chinatown, New York City.

New York City changes and evolves at a rapid pace. In certain areas, changes occur faster than others. Lower Manhattan is one place that has changed the most in the last decade. Development happens fast and the current trends are extremely tall buildings constructed mostly of glass, chain stores and luxury boutiques. In neighborhoods that were once bohemian and home to artists and rebels, these current changes have been hard to swallow for long-time residents who run the risk of being out-priced out of the neighborhoods they have called home for decades.

Despite these changes, there are still parts of lower Manhattan that recall earlier decades. New York City suffered economically in the 1970s and it was during this decade that much of lower Manhattan was transformed into a danger zone full of abandoned lots and buildings and rampant crime. Having grown up in New York City in the 1980s and early 1990s, I have vivid memories of riding graffiti-covered trains from Queens into Manhattan. I was taught to ‘watch my back’ at all times since everyone seemed to know someone who had been mugged. Things were still different in those days prior to the initiatives by mayors Koch and Guiliani to ‘clean up’ the city (and discourse is still rampant regarding how they handled it).

When I came across this section of Canal Street while walking home from getting groceries a few months back, my heart almost leaped out of my chest. Here I was staring at a section of a spot in Chinatown that seemed as if it had been dipped in 1980s New York City and had become frozen in time (thankfully I had my camera). It’s hard to put into words how powerful this scene is for personally. It’s a bit like staring at something that once existed in a distant life.

A city may change rapidly discarding pieces of itself, but it’s the people who carry it’s broken pieces with them in their hearts who imbue the city with its memory.

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View this photo larger and on black on my Google Plus page

—-

Buy “Decay” Posters and Prints here, View my store, email me, or ask for help.

Skybridge and fire escapes. Tribeca, New York City.

Parts of the city entwine itself around my thoughts nestling deep into my memory making visual imprints I can’t ignore. It’s this scenery that makes me fall in love with this city over and over again. I fall in love with different streets furiously and often. Each one charms me in a completely different way. It’s in the way the light falls on fire escapes, the windows that cast a warm glow onto the street, the architecture that holds the ghosts of decades past deeply in its arms.

A very visceral reaction occurs when I come across scenery that moves me. It’s an emotional feeling which I can only compare to the feeling of listening to music that inspires me. I have been a musician since I was four years old. Music was my first passion. I would frequently lose myself in hours of piano playing; time froze in those moments. The world spun around me in a dizzying circle while I remained perfectly still. It’s the same feeling I get when I listen to certain music: an overwhelming sense that my heart could leap out of my chest at any minute. 

I get this same exact feeling with photography. I wouldn’t trade it for anything.


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View this photo larger and on black on my Google Plus page

—-


Buy “Twilight in Tribeca” Posters and Prints here, View my store, email me, or ask for help.

Skybridge and fire escapes. Tribeca, New York City.

Parts of the city entwine itself around my thoughts nestling deep into my memory making visual imprints I can’t ignore. It’s this scenery that makes me fall in love with this city over and over again. I fall in love with different streets furiously and often. Each one charms me in a completely different way. It’s in the way the light falls on fire escapes, the windows that cast a warm glow onto the street, the architecture that holds the ghosts of decades past deeply in its arms.

A very visceral reaction occurs when I come across scenery that moves me. It’s an emotional feeling which I can only compare to the feeling of listening to music that inspires me. I have been a musician since I was four years old. Music was my first passion. I would frequently lose myself in hours of piano playing; time froze in those moments. The world spun around me in a dizzying circle while I remained perfectly still. It’s the same feeling I get when I listen to certain music: an overwhelming sense that my heart could leap out of my chest at any minute.

I get this same exact feeling with photography. I wouldn’t trade it for anything.

—-

View this photo larger and on black on my Google Plus page

—-

Buy “Twilight in Tribeca” Posters and Prints here, View my store, email me, or ask for help.