NY Through the Lens - New York City Photography

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Autumn light. Central Park, New York City

It’s in the way the sunlight streams through the last vestiges of autumn: as golden as the leaves that hold onto their branches.

It’s in the way the earth bares itself under this fanfare: as vulnerable as new lover’s heartbeats buried under layers of clothing.

Winter’s prelude starts slowly: a distant refrain that works its way through the earth chilled in anticipation.

We slow-dance on this mortal coil to the adagio of life twisting and turning with the whims of the winds that scatter our spirit to the ends of the earth.

It’s all we can do.


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Interested in more of what a New York autumn looks like? Check out my guide to the best Central Park autumn views here:

Top 8 Autumn Views in Central Park

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View:  “New York Autumn - Central Park - Trees and Fall Foliage” in my portfolio, My Gear List, My Travel Blog,  email me, or ask for help.

Autumn light. Central Park, New York City

It’s in the way the sunlight streams through the last vestiges of autumn: as golden as the leaves that hold onto their branches.

It’s in the way the earth bares itself under this fanfare: as vulnerable as new lover’s heartbeats buried under layers of clothing.

Winter’s prelude starts slowly: a distant refrain that works its way through the earth chilled in anticipation.

We slow-dance on this mortal coil to the adagio of life twisting and turning with the whims of the winds that scatter our spirit to the ends of the earth.

It’s all we can do.

—-

Interested in more of what a New York autumn looks like? Check out my guide to the best Central Park autumn views here:

Top 8 Autumn Views in Central Park

—-

View: “New York Autumn - Central Park - Trees and Fall Foliage” in my portfolio, My Gear List, My Travel Blog, email me, or ask for help.

Rain. New York City. Greenwich Village.

When the sky opens up over the city, urban wanderers glide over the surface of streets slick with shadowy memory.

And every drop of rain holds the world in its slippery grasp.

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Recently, someone who saw this same photo in black and white inquired if I also had the image available in color. Since I shoot in color and convert my color photos to black and white after the fact (with a few exceptions), I went through my library and found my color rendition of this scene. I was struck with how the photo evoked a different set of emotions when viewing it in color. I have come to love it in black and white to such an extent that my memory of the scene as it occurred also plays out in my mind in black and white. However, I remember the initial appeal of this candid moment was the strong bursts of color against the winter-bare trees. The day was bitterly cold: the type of damp cold that seeps down to the bone and in one short moment, the street erupted with color. It was such a fleeting moment but it created such a spark. 

On a related note, I read an interesting essay by Joel Meyerwitz a few days ago on the New York Times Lens Blog called A Question of Colors - Answered. Meyerwitz is part of a current exhibition in London which compares some of Henri Cartier-Bresson’s black and white images with work by other noted photographers who have been influenced by him but have chosen to work in color for a large part of their photography careers. The curator of this particular exhibition states that: “This exhibition will show how Henri Cartier-Bresson, in spite of his skeptical attitude regarding the artistic value of colour photography, nevertheless exerted a powerful influence over photographers who took up the new medium and who were determined to put a personal stamp on it. In effect, his criticisms of colour spurred on a new generation, determined to overcome the obstacles and prove him wrong.” 

It’s interesting to me that color photography inhabits a more defensive realm than black and white photography especially when it comes to street photography. I think that both have different psychological effects on the viewer and both can be just as valid in terms of having artistic value. However, it’s definitely not a simple debate. 

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View this photo larger and on black on my Google Plus page

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Buy “Rain - New York City - Greenwich Village - Washington Square” Posters and Prints here, View my store, email me, or ask for help.

Rain. New York City. Greenwich Village.

When the sky opens up over the city, urban wanderers glide over the surface of streets slick with shadowy memory.

And every drop of rain holds the world in its slippery grasp.

—-

Recently, someone who saw this same photo in black and white inquired if I also had the image available in color. Since I shoot in color and convert my color photos to black and white after the fact (with a few exceptions), I went through my library and found my color rendition of this scene. I was struck with how the photo evoked a different set of emotions when viewing it in color. I have come to love it in black and white to such an extent that my memory of the scene as it occurred also plays out in my mind in black and white. However, I remember the initial appeal of this candid moment was the strong bursts of color against the winter-bare trees. The day was bitterly cold: the type of damp cold that seeps down to the bone and in one short moment, the street erupted with color. It was such a fleeting moment but it created such a spark.

On a related note, I read an interesting essay by Joel Meyerwitz a few days ago on the New York Times Lens Blog called A Question of Colors - Answered. Meyerwitz is part of a current exhibition in London which compares some of Henri Cartier-Bresson’s black and white images with work by other noted photographers who have been influenced by him but have chosen to work in color for a large part of their photography careers. The curator of this particular exhibition states that: “This exhibition will show how Henri Cartier-Bresson, in spite of his skeptical attitude regarding the artistic value of colour photography, nevertheless exerted a powerful influence over photographers who took up the new medium and who were determined to put a personal stamp on it. In effect, his criticisms of colour spurred on a new generation, determined to overcome the obstacles and prove him wrong.”

It’s interesting to me that color photography inhabits a more defensive realm than black and white photography especially when it comes to street photography. I think that both have different psychological effects on the viewer and both can be just as valid in terms of having artistic value. However, it’s definitely not a simple debate.

—-

View this photo larger and on black on my Google Plus page

—-

Buy “Rain - New York City - Greenwich Village - Washington Square” Posters and Prints here, View my store, email me, or ask for help.

Hurricane Sandy debris on Delancey Street on Monday morning. Lower East Side, New York City. 

Tons of debris seen earlier this morning looking down Delancey Street on the Lower East Side of Manhattan. The wind was pretty harsh at that time and it’s even more brutal now. A huge wind gust just literally shook my entire apartment (I live on the 5th floor of a very, very old walk-up).

Just got a robo-call from Con Ed saying that power may be shut off here on the Lower East Side. If I don’t update again for a while, that’s why. Stay safe all! 

In case you missed my earlier post, you can catch me on my Twitter mainly (unless the power goes totally out everywhere) until the middle of this week unless I have to go out for some completely insane reason.

—-

View the rest of the posts about Hurricane Sandy in NYC on this blog here:

Hurricane Sandy New York City

—-

View my store, email me, ask for help, or subscribe to the mailing list.

Hurricane Sandy debris on Delancey Street on Monday morning. Lower East Side, New York City.

Tons of debris seen earlier this morning looking down Delancey Street on the Lower East Side of Manhattan. The wind was pretty harsh at that time and it’s even more brutal now. A huge wind gust just literally shook my entire apartment (I live on the 5th floor of a very, very old walk-up).

Just got a robo-call from Con Ed saying that power may be shut off here on the Lower East Side. If I don’t update again for a while, that’s why. Stay safe all!

In case you missed my earlier post, you can catch me on my Twitter mainly (unless the power goes totally out everywhere) until the middle of this week unless I have to go out for some completely insane reason.

—-

View the rest of the posts about Hurricane Sandy in NYC on this blog here:

Hurricane Sandy New York City

—-

View my store, email me, ask for help, or subscribe to the mailing list.

New York City Skyscrapers. Midtown.

They rise: stalagmites borne from an earth bursting at the seams with lofty aspirations.

And the city’s streets weave their way through them: well-worn crevices on the surface of dreams.

—-

This is one of my favorite views of the skyscrapers of midtown Manhattan. It’s a view from the top of the Empire State Building. I have always loved the variety of architecture and intensely dense feel of this patch of the New York City skyline. 

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View this photo larger and on black on my Google Plus page

—-

Buy “New York City Skyscrapers” Posters and Prints here, View my store, email me, or ask for help.

New York City Skyscrapers. Midtown.

They rise: stalagmites borne from an earth bursting at the seams with lofty aspirations.

And the city’s streets weave their way through them: well-worn crevices on the surface of dreams.

—-

This is one of my favorite views of the skyscrapers of midtown Manhattan. It’s a view from the top of the Empire State Building. I have always loved the variety of architecture and intensely dense feel of this patch of the New York City skyline.

—-

View this photo larger and on black on my Google Plus page

—-

Buy “New York City Skyscrapers” Posters and Prints here, View my store, email me, or ask for help.