NY Through the Lens - New York City Photography

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New York City - West Village Street

—-

These streets

hang on the

trailing ends

of thoughts

that rest 

in between memory

and wishing:

heartbreak-paved,

tree-lined

arteries that twist

their way into

late-night recollections

of the best of times.



—-

Leaving for Paris in a few hours.

I don’t think it has totally sunk in yet. It probably won’t until I am sitting on the runway.

I figured what better farewell to NYC for the next 10 days than sharing a photograph of one of my favorite streets in the West Village: Perry Street. 

—-

View: “New York City - Perry Street - West Village” in my photography portfolio, My Gear List, My Travel Blog, On G+,email me, or ask for help.

New York City - West Village Street

—-

These streets

hang on the

trailing ends

of thoughts

that rest

in between memory

and wishing:

heartbreak-paved,

tree-lined

arteries that twist

their way into

late-night recollections

of the best of times.

—-

Leaving for Paris in a few hours.

I don’t think it has totally sunk in yet. It probably won’t until I am sitting on the runway.

I figured what better farewell to NYC for the next 10 days than sharing a photograph of one of my favorite streets in the West Village: Perry Street.

—-

View: “New York City - Perry Street - West Village” in my photography portfolio, My Gear List, My Travel Blog, On G+,email me, or ask for help.

Above New York City. Chinatown - Two Bridges.—-

Sometimes it’s a shift in perspective that shifts everything around you. 

—-

This is a view above Monroe Street in Chinatown. The neighborhood is also known as Two Bridges due to its proximity to the Manhattan Bridge and the Brooklyn Bridge. 

—-

This was taken with my phone. I am @newyorklens on Instagram (view my feed here).  Check out my other  phone photography posts made to this blog, and my mobile photography photos on Flickr.

—-


View my
photography portfolio here, email me, or ask for
help.

Above New York City. Chinatown - Two Bridges.


—-

Sometimes it’s a shift in perspective that shifts everything around you.

—-

This is a view above Monroe Street in Chinatown. The neighborhood is also known as Two Bridges due to its proximity to the Manhattan Bridge and the Brooklyn Bridge.

—-

This was taken with my phone. I am @newyorklens on Instagram (view my feed here). Check out my other phone photography posts made to this blog, and my mobile photography photos on Flickr.

—-


View my photography portfolio here, email me, or ask for help.

New York City townhouses. Midtown. —-

On days like this, it’s as if the rest of the world has slipped away with the winter somewhere past the visible horizon into the realm of distant memories. 

On days like this, the sun exhales through the trees that spread their newly adorned limbs out in a welcoming embrace. 

On days like this, the city lingers in a promise whispered on a warm breeze.

On days like this, the light is a dream that makes its way into reality. 

On days like this, there is nothing else that matters.

—-
This image was taken this past weekend as I walked around Manhattan for hours soaking in the gorgeous weather. I have mentioned my severe brownstone envy in other posts before. I believe that townhouses fall under this same category. To re-iterate, I grew up in Queens (another borough of New York City), and the brownstones in Manhattan and Brooklyn tugged at my heart constantly. Their enormous doorways always seemed to be flanked by extravagant stairways and every window seemed to be a frame encapsulating an enticing painting.

There wasn’t anything that came close to these beautiful works of architecture where I grew up in Flushing, Queens. And don’t even get me started on the Cosby Show which added to my angsty brownstone envy on a weekly basis. I still stop in my tracks and swoon when I come across a particularly beautiful set of brownstones or townhouses. I imagine all of the narratives that could have possibly occurred in these fantastical works of architecture and it’s enough to take me right back to feeling exactly how I did when I was growing up in Queens.

—-I was super fortunate to get my hands on the Sony NEX-6 recently (which I used for this image). For those who don’t know, the NEX series is quite popular right now. They are part of a newer breed of mirrorless interchangeable-lens cameras. This means that they are super compact and light (around 12 oz!). It felt odd carrying around a camera that weighed significantly less than most dSLRs and dSLTs and yet seems to rival the image quality. Is the future mirrorless? Maybe. I can say I am having a bit of a love affair with the NEX-6 (don’t tell my other camera). I will post more images taken with this camera peppered in with my other photos from time to time, for sure.  

—-View this photo with a comment thread on my Google Plus page—-View “New York City Townhouses” in my photography portfolio here, email me, or ask for help.

New York City townhouses. Midtown.


—-

On days like this, it’s as if the rest of the world has slipped away with the winter somewhere past the visible horizon into the realm of distant memories.

On days like this, the sun exhales through the trees that spread their newly adorned limbs out in a welcoming embrace.

On days like this, the city lingers in a promise whispered on a warm breeze.

On days like this, the light is a dream that makes its way into reality.

On days like this, there is nothing else that matters.

—-


This image was taken this past weekend as I walked around Manhattan for hours soaking in the gorgeous weather. I have mentioned my severe brownstone envy in other posts before. I believe that townhouses fall under this same category. To re-iterate, I grew up in Queens (another borough of New York City), and the brownstones in Manhattan and Brooklyn tugged at my heart constantly. Their enormous doorways always seemed to be flanked by extravagant stairways and every window seemed to be a frame encapsulating an enticing painting.

There wasn’t anything that came close to these beautiful works of architecture where I grew up in Flushing, Queens. And don’t even get me started on the Cosby Show which added to my angsty brownstone envy on a weekly basis. I still stop in my tracks and swoon when I come across a particularly beautiful set of brownstones or townhouses. I imagine all of the narratives that could have possibly occurred in these fantastical works of architecture and it’s enough to take me right back to feeling exactly how I did when I was growing up in Queens.

—-


I was super fortunate to get my hands on the Sony NEX-6 recently (which I used for this image). For those who don’t know, the NEX series is quite popular right now. They are part of a newer breed of mirrorless interchangeable-lens cameras. This means that they are super compact and light (around 12 oz!). It felt odd carrying around a camera that weighed significantly less than most dSLRs and dSLTs and yet seems to rival the image quality. Is the future mirrorless? Maybe. I can say I am having a bit of a love affair with the NEX-6 (don’t tell my other camera). I will post more images taken with this camera peppered in with my other photos from time to time, for sure.

—-


View this photo with a comment thread on my Google Plus page


—-


View “New York City Townhouses” in my photography portfolio here, email me, or ask for help.

Stone Street Historic District. South William Street. Financial District - New York City.

Something I absolutely love about New York City is that tucked away between the towering monuments of modernity that populate the cityscape are streets that look as if they have been transported from another era and geographic location entirely. These streets are suspended in time like flies in amber.

This area is known as the Stone Street historic district in lower Manhattan. Bound by Stone Street, Pearl Street, and South William Streets and Mill Lane, it is a section that is unlike any of its surrounding blocks. This particular section is bound by South William street and 13-15 South William Street can be seen in this particular view. Around the block from this part of the area are other historic buildings and the Stone Street area ‘proper’.

In 1903, the architect C.P.H. Gilbert designed new street facades on the buildings in this section of South William Street (57 Stone Street on the other side). Gilbert’s neo-Dutch Renaissance architecture features structural details like stepped gables and strapwork and was a nod to the early settlement of Manhattan.

This area which dates back to the 1600s when New York City was first colonized by Dutch settlers was sadly destroyed by the Great Fire of 1835. The surrounding section of Stone Street was rebuilt with granite bases of post-and-lintel construction and upper-additions of brick which were specifically erected for importers and merchants.

—-

View this photo larger and on black on my Google Plus page
—-

Buy “Stone Street Historic District - Financial District - New York City” Posters and Prints here, email me, or ask for help.

Stone Street Historic District. South William Street. Financial District - New York City.

Something I absolutely love about New York City is that tucked away between the towering monuments of modernity that populate the cityscape are streets that look as if they have been transported from another era and geographic location entirely. These streets are suspended in time like flies in amber.

This area is known as the Stone Street historic district in lower Manhattan. Bound by Stone Street, Pearl Street, and South William Streets and Mill Lane, it is a section that is unlike any of its surrounding blocks. This particular section is bound by South William street and 13-15 South William Street can be seen in this particular view. Around the block from this part of the area are other historic buildings and the Stone Street area ‘proper’.

In 1903, the architect C.P.H. Gilbert designed new street facades on the buildings in this section of South William Street (57 Stone Street on the other side). Gilbert’s neo-Dutch Renaissance architecture features structural details like stepped gables and strapwork and was a nod to the early settlement of Manhattan.

This area which dates back to the 1600s when New York City was first colonized by Dutch settlers was sadly destroyed by the Great Fire of 1835. The surrounding section of Stone Street was rebuilt with granite bases of post-and-lintel construction and upper-additions of brick which were specifically erected for importers and merchants.

—-

View this photo larger and on black on my Google Plus page

—-

Buy “Stone Street Historic District - Financial District - New York City” Posters and Prints here, email me, or ask for help.