NY Through the Lens - New York City Photography

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Williamsburg Bridge pedestrian walkway. New York City. I have been on a strange sort of journey lately when it comes to photography. And I have noticed a shift in my vision or rather a slight deepening of meaning that I am seeking when it comes to the imagery I have been consuming and capturing. I have been watching a tremendous amount of documentaries about photography and photographers trying to understand where my own peculiar sort of artistic unrest is originating from. I suspect the angst has to do with a visual tiredness and unease at the overwhelming amount of imagery that seems to be in circulation at any given moment online. I am pondering writing a series of essays on the rise of mass consumption and sharing and how it correlates to various trends in offline photography but the ideas are all still percolating. 

A series that really, really touched me though is called Contacts. I devoured all of Contacts: Volume 2 - The Revival of 
Contemporary Photography  and Contacts: Volume 3: Conceptual Photography over the course of two nights.  It’s a collection of tiny vignettes that explore different photographer’s contact sheets and/or body of work while they explain or talk about their work. I think I have watched the vignette of Sarah Moon’s work set to her stream-of-consciousness description of her own inward photographic journey over a dozen times at this point (it even ended up on my "Scenes that have stuck to my ribs and clung to my heart" playlist on Youtube: the ultimate testament to it becoming a part of my consciousness permanently ;) ). 

When I first watched it and listened, I could barely stop the tears from flowing because it was absolutely perfect (and even that would be an understatement): 

Contacts: Volume 2 - Sarah Moon

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I had an entirely different set of thoughts I wanted to include with this image of the Williamsburg Bridge (taken with the trusty Sony A99) but I seem to have veered in a different direction perhaps because all of this has been on my mind for weeks. And that’s fine, now that I think of it, because in some ways, there couldn’t be a more fitting recent image to accompany this post.

“Time goes by. Light falls. I lose confidence. I don’t want to be a photographer anymore…

Then, all of a sudden, but not always, something changes, I can’t say why, maybe I’m just in the right place at the right time, or maybe I believe in it. 


However, for a split second, I see a sparkle of beauty passing by, everything goes so quickly now within that stillness, and I’m carried away, and at last I like what I see, and I can’t stop finding it, then losing it, and all day long I keep on, because it once existed.” - Sarah Moon


—-View this photo with a comment thread on my Google Plus page—-View “Willamsburg Bridge - New York City” in my photography portfolio here, email me, or ask for help.

Williamsburg Bridge pedestrian walkway. New York City.


I have been on a strange sort of journey lately when it comes to photography. And I have noticed a shift in my vision or rather a slight deepening of meaning that I am seeking when it comes to the imagery I have been consuming and capturing. I have been watching a tremendous amount of documentaries about photography and photographers trying to understand where my own peculiar sort of artistic unrest is originating from. I suspect the angst has to do with a visual tiredness and unease at the overwhelming amount of imagery that seems to be in circulation at any given moment online. I am pondering writing a series of essays on the rise of mass consumption and sharing and how it correlates to various trends in offline photography but the ideas are all still percolating.

A series that really, really touched me though is called Contacts. I devoured all of Contacts: Volume 2 - The Revival of Contemporary Photography and Contacts: Volume 3: Conceptual Photography over the course of two nights. It’s a collection of tiny vignettes that explore different photographer’s contact sheets and/or body of work while they explain or talk about their work. I think I have watched the vignette of Sarah Moon’s work set to her stream-of-consciousness description of her own inward photographic journey over a dozen times at this point (it even ended up on my "Scenes that have stuck to my ribs and clung to my heart" playlist on Youtube: the ultimate testament to it becoming a part of my consciousness permanently ;) ).

When I first watched it and listened, I could barely stop the tears from flowing because it was absolutely perfect (and even that would be an understatement):

Contacts: Volume 2 - Sarah Moon

—-

I had an entirely different set of thoughts I wanted to include with this image of the Williamsburg Bridge (taken with the trusty Sony A99) but I seem to have veered in a different direction perhaps because all of this has been on my mind for weeks. And that’s fine, now that I think of it, because in some ways, there couldn’t be a more fitting recent image to accompany this post.

“Time goes by. Light falls. I lose confidence. I don’t want to be a photographer anymore…

Then, all of a sudden, but not always, something changes, I can’t say why, maybe I’m just in the right place at the right time, or maybe I believe in it.

However, for a split second, I see a sparkle of beauty passing by, everything goes so quickly now within that stillness, and I’m carried away, and at last I like what I see, and I can’t stop finding it, then losing it, and all day long I keep on, because it once existed.” - Sarah Moon

—-


View this photo with a comment thread on my Google Plus page


—-


View “Willamsburg Bridge - New York City” in my photography portfolio here, email me, or ask for help.

Early Sunday morning on Orchard Street. Lower East Side. New York City.

On cold city mornings, birds pepper the bone-white sky with movement. 

And through the haze left over by clouds caught in the scuffle between autumn and winter, the wind rushes through the streets like the ghosts of yesterday’s thoughts.


—-

View this photo larger and on black on my Google Plus page

—-

Buy “Sunday Morning on Orchard Street - Lower East Side - New York City” Posters and Prints here, email me, or ask for help.

Early Sunday morning on Orchard Street. Lower East Side. New York City.

On cold city mornings, birds pepper the bone-white sky with movement.

And through the haze left over by clouds caught in the scuffle between autumn and winter, the wind rushes through the streets like the ghosts of yesterday’s thoughts.

—-

View this photo larger and on black on my Google Plus page

—-

Buy “Sunday Morning on Orchard Street - Lower East Side - New York City” Posters and Prints here, email me, or ask for help.

Rain. Greenwich Village, New York City.

Rain is the sky’s love song to the city.

The sky opens up revealing an other-worldly light that cloaks the city in effervescent splendor. 

Sidewalks and streets, slick with promise, mirror the movement of urban explorers navigating the sleek concrete as taxi lights shine their refracted, blurred lights into the vast expanse of the rain-soaked landscape.


—-

Sharing this photo today since I talked about it (briefly) and a few other photos of mine on Trey Ratcliff's Stuck in Customs Show last night. Trey was traveling and I was asked last minute if I would be on the show with a few other street photographers to discuss some of our work. It was a great time! The other photographers on the show were Eric Kim and Rinzi Ruiz and it was hosted by Karen Hutton and Dave Veffer. I am already a huge fan of Eric’s street photography but I wasn’t familiar with Rinzi’s work and it completely blew me away. 

While the majority of my work tends to focus on New York City’s landscapes and architecture and is devoid of people, it was nice to discuss a few of my photos that do have people in them and talk a little bit about my philosophy on shooting people in the city and the narratives I tend to gravitate towards when dealing with people shots.

 It’s always interesting to see how certain themes emerge with any art form and I seem to have a fondness for street photography in the rain. I blame New York City for that fondness. It’s just so incredibly moody and beautiful when it rains here :). 

You can view the show from last night here: Trey’s Variety Hour #53: Street Photography

—-

View this photo larger and on black on my Google Plus page

—-

Buy “Rain - Greenwich Village - New York City” Prints here, email me, or ask for help.

Rain. Greenwich Village, New York City.

Rain is the sky’s love song to the city.

The sky opens up revealing an other-worldly light that cloaks the city in effervescent splendor.

Sidewalks and streets, slick with promise, mirror the movement of urban explorers navigating the sleek concrete as taxi lights shine their refracted, blurred lights into the vast expanse of the rain-soaked landscape.

—-

Sharing this photo today since I talked about it (briefly) and a few other photos of mine on Trey Ratcliff's Stuck in Customs Show last night. Trey was traveling and I was asked last minute if I would be on the show with a few other street photographers to discuss some of our work. It was a great time! The other photographers on the show were Eric Kim and Rinzi Ruiz and it was hosted by Karen Hutton and Dave Veffer. I am already a huge fan of Eric’s street photography but I wasn’t familiar with Rinzi’s work and it completely blew me away.

While the majority of my work tends to focus on New York City’s landscapes and architecture and is devoid of people, it was nice to discuss a few of my photos that do have people in them and talk a little bit about my philosophy on shooting people in the city and the narratives I tend to gravitate towards when dealing with people shots.

It’s always interesting to see how certain themes emerge with any art form and I seem to have a fondness for street photography in the rain. I blame New York City for that fondness. It’s just so incredibly moody and beautiful when it rains here :).

You can view the show from last night here: Trey’s Variety Hour #53: Street Photography

—-

View this photo larger and on black on my Google Plus page

—-

Buy “Rain - Greenwich Village - New York City” Prints here, email me, or ask for help.

Lower East Side alley. New York City.

In the darkest canals of the city where light seeps through slowly, wanderers emerge bleary-eyed into the sun: birthed explorers carrying darkness into the light.

—-

There is a solitary aspect to living in such a highly populated city such as New York City. 

It’s easier to sink into the shadows.

People pass in stairways and on sidewalks with vigorous abandon : ghosts brushing shoulders in a daily anonymous tango.

—-

View this photo larger and on black on my Google Plus page


—-

Buy “In the Shadows - Lower East Side Alley - New York City” Prints here, email me, or ask for help.

Lower East Side alley. New York City.

In the darkest canals of the city where light seeps through slowly, wanderers emerge bleary-eyed into the sun: birthed explorers carrying darkness into the light.

—-

There is a solitary aspect to living in such a highly populated city such as New York City.

It’s easier to sink into the shadows.

People pass in stairways and on sidewalks with vigorous abandon : ghosts brushing shoulders in a daily anonymous tango.

—-

View this photo larger and on black on my Google Plus page

—-

Buy “In the Shadows - Lower East Side Alley - New York City” Prints here, email me, or ask for help.