NY Through the Lens - New York City Photography

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The New York City skyline with Financial District skyscrapers in lower Manhattan.In the winter, there is a clarity and edge that is carried on the frigid fingers of icy air and crystallized exhales. —-I have been really getting into long exposures. There is something incredibly zen about the experience of setting up, and taking long exposures. The waiting is interesting. It forces a pause in the process. You start to be hyper-aware of the movement of clouds and light transitions. In the winter especially, it’s a commitment. The minute or so of waiting seems to encompass an eternity of thought(s). —-This is a 30 second exposure of the lower Manhattan skyline featuring the skyscrapers of the Financial District and Pier 17 taken with the Sony a99. The Freedom Tower (also known as 1 WTC or One World Trade Center), New York by Gehry, the Woolworth Building and the spire of the Municipal Building can all be seen here.
 —-View this photo with a comment thread on my Google Plus page—-View “New York City Skyline - Financial District Skyscrapers” in my photography portfolio here, email me, or ask for help.

The New York City skyline with Financial District skyscrapers in lower Manhattan.


In the winter, there is a clarity and edge that is carried on the frigid fingers of icy air and crystallized exhales.


—-


I have been really getting into long exposures. There is something incredibly zen about the experience of setting up, and taking long exposures. The waiting is interesting. It forces a pause in the process. You start to be hyper-aware of the movement of clouds and light transitions. In the winter especially, it’s a commitment. The minute or so of waiting seems to encompass an eternity of thought(s).


—-


This is a 30 second exposure of the lower Manhattan skyline featuring the skyscrapers of the Financial District and Pier 17 taken with the Sony a99. The Freedom Tower (also known as 1 WTC or One World Trade Center), New York by Gehry, the Woolworth Building and the spire of the Municipal Building can all be seen here.


—-


View this photo with a comment thread on my Google Plus page


—-


View “New York City Skyline - Financial District Skyscrapers” in my photography portfolio here, email me, or ask for help.

Stone Street. New York City’s first paved street. Financial District.Stone Street is a narrow cobblestone alley that was first developed by Dutch colonists in the 1600s. Its claim to fame is that it is New York City’s first paved street and as such it is recognized as a historic landmark. 

It’s the main part of an area currently known as the Stone Street Historic District. Nestled among skyscrapers in the Financial District, it’s something of a time machine back into another era of New York City’s history. The street is the site where British merchants traded and sold goods, where American colonialists passionately spoke of independence and where tracts of land were purchased and sold (completely disregarding the earlier inhabitants of the area). 

The Dutch West India Company first sold this area to European property owners in the mid 1600s. It was around 1658 that the street was paved. The name Stone Street actually came about in the late 1700s. Prior to being named Stone Street, this alley was called Hoogh Straet and then Brouwer Street and also spent some time as Duke Street. Since the street is so close to the waterfront, it was the site of a tremendous amount of commercial activity for two centuries.

In the mid 1800s, the area was destroyed by the Great Fire. Even though the Great Fire leveled hundreds of buildings in the area, the Stone Street district bounced back due to New York City having the leading maritime port in the country. However, in the mid twentieth century the area saw a decline due to maritime activity moving to the west side of Manhattan. In the mid 1990s, funding was secured to restore the area back to its former glory. 
 

—-Shot with the Sony a99 a few days ago on a bitterly cold winter day here in New York City, I can’t think of a better time to experience this historic alley. It comes to life in the summer when it is full of chairs and tables linked to the many dining establishments that now inhabit the buildings along Stone Street. But it’s in the winter when the light barely reaches through to the ground and when the breeze from the river cuts through to the bone that it makes an indelible mark on the heart.—-View this photo with a comment thread on my Google Plus page—-Buy “Stone Street - New York City” Posters and Prints here, email me, or ask for help.

Stone Street. New York City’s first paved street. Financial District.


Stone Street is a narrow cobblestone alley that was first developed by Dutch colonists in the 1600s. Its claim to fame is that it is New York City’s first paved street and as such it is recognized as a historic landmark.

It’s the main part of an area currently known as the Stone Street Historic District. Nestled among skyscrapers in the Financial District, it’s something of a time machine back into another era of New York City’s history. The street is the site where British merchants traded and sold goods, where American colonialists passionately spoke of independence and where tracts of land were purchased and sold (completely disregarding the earlier inhabitants of the area).

The Dutch West India Company first sold this area to European property owners in the mid 1600s. It was around 1658 that the street was paved. The name Stone Street actually came about in the late 1700s. Prior to being named Stone Street, this alley was called Hoogh Straet and then Brouwer Street and also spent some time as Duke Street. Since the street is so close to the waterfront, it was the site of a tremendous amount of commercial activity for two centuries.

In the mid 1800s, the area was destroyed by the Great Fire. Even though the Great Fire leveled hundreds of buildings in the area, the Stone Street district bounced back due to New York City having the leading maritime port in the country. However, in the mid twentieth century the area saw a decline due to maritime activity moving to the west side of Manhattan. In the mid 1990s, funding was secured to restore the area back to its former glory.

—-


Shot with the Sony a99 a few days ago on a bitterly cold winter day here in New York City, I can’t think of a better time to experience this historic alley. It comes to life in the summer when it is full of chairs and tables linked to the many dining establishments that now inhabit the buildings along Stone Street. But it’s in the winter when the light barely reaches through to the ground and when the breeze from the river cuts through to the bone that it makes an indelible mark on the heart.


—-


View this photo with a comment thread on my Google Plus page


—-


Buy “Stone Street - New York City” Posters and Prints here, email me, or ask for help.

The New York City skyline and the Statue of Liberty at sunset as seen from under the Brooklyn Bridge.

Every evening, the sun slides slowly down along the sky gleaming and floating above the city.

Reaching through the clouds to look at its reflection of liquid gold in the water below, it pauses. 

And in those brief moments, it’s as if the earth has stopped revolving just long enough for the sun and the city to kiss.

—-

This was taken while on a boat in the East River passing under the Brooklyn Bridge. The skyline is the lower Manhattan skyline featuring the skyscrapers of the Financial District and Pier 17 at South Street Seaport. To the left in the distance, sits the Statue of Liberty.

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View this photo larger and on black on my Google Plus page

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Buy “The New York City Skyline and the Statue of Liberty at Sunset - Under the Brooklyn Bridge” Prints here, email me, or ask for help.

The New York City skyline and the Statue of Liberty at sunset as seen from under the Brooklyn Bridge.

Every evening, the sun slides slowly down along the sky gleaming and floating above the city.

Reaching through the clouds to look at its reflection of liquid gold in the water below, it pauses.

And in those brief moments, it’s as if the earth has stopped revolving just long enough for the sun and the city to kiss.

—-

This was taken while on a boat in the East River passing under the Brooklyn Bridge. The skyline is the lower Manhattan skyline featuring the skyscrapers of the Financial District and Pier 17 at South Street Seaport. To the left in the distance, sits the Statue of Liberty.

—-

View this photo larger and on black on my Google Plus page

—-

Buy “The New York City Skyline and the Statue of Liberty at Sunset - Under the Brooklyn Bridge” Prints here, email me, or ask for help.

The Brooklyn Bridge and New York City skyline.

On hazy summer afternoons when dusk pulls its soft purple veil over the city, the skyline softens momentarily in the dreamy-eyed gaze of the clouds.

And as light slides from the sky making its way over steel, wood and concrete towards the disintegrating horizon, bridges and skyscrapers melt with the sun into the evening. 

—-


View this photo larger and on black on my Google Plus page

—-

Buy “The Brooklyn Bridge and the New York City Skyline” Prints here, email me, or ask for help.

The Brooklyn Bridge and New York City skyline.

On hazy summer afternoons when dusk pulls its soft purple veil over the city, the skyline softens momentarily in the dreamy-eyed gaze of the clouds.

And as light slides from the sky making its way over steel, wood and concrete towards the disintegrating horizon, bridges and skyscrapers melt with the sun into the evening.

—-

View this photo larger and on black on my Google Plus page

—-

Buy “The Brooklyn Bridge and the New York City Skyline” Prints here, email me, or ask for help.