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New York City - Night under the Queensboro Bridge


For a really long time, I avoided night photography. When I first started photography, understanding natural daylight was enough of a challenge. One can spend their entire life mastering the subtle nature of daylight and its effect on an infinite variety of scenes.

The turning point for me occurred on a frigid winter night in New York City, when I ….. continue reading here… 

This is my weekly blog post to the PDN site over in the PDN Emerging Photographer’s section. 

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Enjoy! 

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If you wish to interact with this post, feel free to do so here


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View “Under the Ed Koch Queensboro Bridge - New York City”  in my photography portfolio here, email me, or ask for help.

New York City - Night under the Queensboro Bridge

For a really long time, I avoided night photography. When I first started photography, understanding natural daylight was enough of a challenge. One can spend their entire life mastering the subtle nature of daylight and its effect on an infinite variety of scenes.

The turning point for me occurred on a frigid winter night in New York City, when I ….. continue reading here…

This is my weekly blog post to the PDN site over in the PDN Emerging Photographer’s section.

—-

Enjoy!

—-

If you wish to interact with this post, feel free to do so here

—-

View “Under the Ed Koch Queensboro Bridge - New York City” in my photography portfolio here, email me, or ask for help.

Under the Ed Koch Queensboro Bridge. Midtown. New York CityI had a recurring dream when I was younger that puzzled me for years. It involved boarding a hovering bubble shaped vehicle and ascending over the skyscrapers until I was soaring under the bridges and through the cavern-like spaces of the city. It was euphoric but also terrifying at the same time. When I was older, I finally relayed the dream to someone and they laughed and asked if I had ever taken the Roosevelt Island tram when I was very young. I had no recollection of it. It prompted me to ask my mother if we had ever done such a thing and she said it was possible but she couldn’t remember a specific time that we would have done it (my mother, like me, is absolutely terrified of heights). It’s possible that my family took the tram to Roosevelt Island at some point and the experience embedded itself deep into my imagination where it mixed with other flights of fancy (pun intended) of flying through a Gotham-like city like Batman.

So, when I found myself photographing the underbelly of the 59th Street Bridge (also known as the Ed Koch Queensboro Bridge or just the Queensboro Bridge) with the Sony A99 late last week, it was hard not to recall those earlier dreams and feelings they invoked while I stood there waiting for the long exposure to capture 30 seconds of what had haunted me for years. The bridge is one of my favorite ones in the city. Its architecture is distinctive when viewed from the side but I absolutely love how slick and dripping-with-sci-fi-overtones it appears when viewed from below. The bridge travels from darkness into the light of a gleaming New York City as the water below it only stirs with the occasional disruption of a boat. You can also make out the cables that the Roosevelt Island tram travels on to the right of the bridge.


—-View this photo with a comment thread on my Google Plus page—-Buy “Under the Ed Koch Queensboro Bridge - New York City” Posters and Prints here, email me, or ask for help.

Under the Ed Koch Queensboro Bridge. Midtown. New York City


I had a recurring dream when I was younger that puzzled me for years. It involved boarding a hovering bubble shaped vehicle and ascending over the skyscrapers until I was soaring under the bridges and through the cavern-like spaces of the city. It was euphoric but also terrifying at the same time. When I was older, I finally relayed the dream to someone and they laughed and asked if I had ever taken the Roosevelt Island tram when I was very young. I had no recollection of it. It prompted me to ask my mother if we had ever done such a thing and she said it was possible but she couldn’t remember a specific time that we would have done it (my mother, like me, is absolutely terrified of heights). It’s possible that my family took the tram to Roosevelt Island at some point and the experience embedded itself deep into my imagination where it mixed with other flights of fancy (pun intended) of flying through a Gotham-like city like Batman.

So, when I found myself photographing the underbelly of the 59th Street Bridge (also known as the Ed Koch Queensboro Bridge or just the Queensboro Bridge) with the Sony A99 late last week, it was hard not to recall those earlier dreams and feelings they invoked while I stood there waiting for the long exposure to capture 30 seconds of what had haunted me for years. The bridge is one of my favorite ones in the city. Its architecture is distinctive when viewed from the side but I absolutely love how slick and dripping-with-sci-fi-overtones it appears when viewed from below. The bridge travels from darkness into the light of a gleaming New York City as the water below it only stirs with the occasional disruption of a boat. You can also make out the cables that the Roosevelt Island tram travels on to the right of the bridge.

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View this photo with a comment thread on my Google Plus page


—-


Buy “Under the Ed Koch Queensboro Bridge - New York City” Posters and Prints here, email me, or ask for help.

The New York City skyline with Financial District skyscrapers in lower Manhattan.In the winter, there is a clarity and edge that is carried on the frigid fingers of icy air and crystallized exhales. —-I have been really getting into long exposures. There is something incredibly zen about the experience of setting up, and taking long exposures. The waiting is interesting. It forces a pause in the process. You start to be hyper-aware of the movement of clouds and light transitions. In the winter especially, it’s a commitment. The minute or so of waiting seems to encompass an eternity of thought(s). —-This is a 30 second exposure of the lower Manhattan skyline featuring the skyscrapers of the Financial District and Pier 17 taken with the Sony a99. The Freedom Tower (also known as 1 WTC or One World Trade Center), New York by Gehry, the Woolworth Building and the spire of the Municipal Building can all be seen here.
 —-View this photo with a comment thread on my Google Plus page—-View “New York City Skyline - Financial District Skyscrapers” in my photography portfolio here, email me, or ask for help.

The New York City skyline with Financial District skyscrapers in lower Manhattan.


In the winter, there is a clarity and edge that is carried on the frigid fingers of icy air and crystallized exhales.


—-


I have been really getting into long exposures. There is something incredibly zen about the experience of setting up, and taking long exposures. The waiting is interesting. It forces a pause in the process. You start to be hyper-aware of the movement of clouds and light transitions. In the winter especially, it’s a commitment. The minute or so of waiting seems to encompass an eternity of thought(s).


—-


This is a 30 second exposure of the lower Manhattan skyline featuring the skyscrapers of the Financial District and Pier 17 taken with the Sony a99. The Freedom Tower (also known as 1 WTC or One World Trade Center), New York by Gehry, the Woolworth Building and the spire of the Municipal Building can all be seen here.


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View this photo with a comment thread on my Google Plus page


—-


View “New York City Skyline - Financial District Skyscrapers” in my photography portfolio here, email me, or ask for help.

New York City. The skyline at sunset. Financial District. New York City is magical

during the pause between night and day

when the sun dips behind the skyline

shining its light out through the twinkling eyes of the buildings.

This time of day is when 

dreams roll off the tongue, 

with a slow-motion exhale 

at the end of a word

in a phrase

that trails off

without end.—-Winter in New York City isn’t the friendliest especially near the water when the wind-chills dip into the single digits and the wind whips across the waves. This is the result of a 30 second long exposure taken last night with the Sony a99 after a long-walk over the Brooklyn Bridge. The view is of the skyscrapers of the Financial District in lower Manhattan and the Statue of Liberty can be seen fading into the sun-streaked horizon. I have always loved the way the skyscrapers in this view just sort of abruptly break up the more open view on the left. I love the moments just after sunset. The sky sinks into a momentary pause before the night sky pulls itself over the city. When everything is devoid of color on cloudy days, the tiny bits of color during these moments that come from the lights in the skyscrapers and the color that streaks across the bone-chilled-grey sky reach right into the heart. —-View this photo with a comment thread on my Google Plus page—-Buy “New York City Skyline at Sunset - Lower Manhattan Skyscrapers” Posters and Prints here, email me, or ask for help.

New York City. The skyline at sunset. Financial District.


New York City is magical
during the pause between night and day
when the sun dips behind the skyline
shining its light out through the twinkling eyes of the buildings.
This time of day is when
dreams roll off the tongue,
with a slow-motion exhale
at the end of a word
in a phrase
that trails off
without end.

—-


Winter in New York City isn’t the friendliest especially near the water when the wind-chills dip into the single digits and the wind whips across the waves. This is the result of a 30 second long exposure taken last night with the Sony a99 after a long-walk over the Brooklyn Bridge. The view is of the skyscrapers of the Financial District in lower Manhattan and the Statue of Liberty can be seen fading into the sun-streaked horizon. I have always loved the way the skyscrapers in this view just sort of abruptly break up the more open view on the left.


I love the moments just after sunset. The sky sinks into a momentary pause before the night sky pulls itself over the city. When everything is devoid of color on cloudy days, the tiny bits of color during these moments that come from the lights in the skyscrapers and the color that streaks across the bone-chilled-grey sky reach right into the heart.


—-


View this photo with a comment thread on my Google Plus page


—-


Buy “New York City Skyline at Sunset - Lower Manhattan Skyscrapers” Posters and Prints here, email me, or ask for help.