NY Through the Lens - New York City Photography

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Early Sunday morning on Orchard Street. Lower East Side. New York City.

On cold city mornings, birds pepper the bone-white sky with movement. 

And through the haze left over by clouds caught in the scuffle between autumn and winter, the wind rushes through the streets like the ghosts of yesterday’s thoughts.


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Buy “Sunday Morning on Orchard Street - Lower East Side - New York City” Posters and Prints here, email me, or ask for help.

Early Sunday morning on Orchard Street. Lower East Side. New York City.

On cold city mornings, birds pepper the bone-white sky with movement.

And through the haze left over by clouds caught in the scuffle between autumn and winter, the wind rushes through the streets like the ghosts of yesterday’s thoughts.

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View this photo larger and on black on my Google Plus page

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Buy “Sunday Morning on Orchard Street - Lower East Side - New York City” Posters and Prints here, email me, or ask for help.

Vesuvio Bakery. Soho. New York City

This is one of my favorite storefronts in Soho. A little over 90 years old, Vesuvio Bakery still looks as it did for decades. A tiny bit about the original owners of the bakery is found in a newspaper article from 2003 :

“Dapolito, 83, worked as a boy in the bakery on Prince St., decades before the neighborhood came to be known as Soho. His father and mother, Nunzio and Jennie, immigrants from Naples, opened it in 1920 and Tony went on to own it after they died.” - Source

 What is interesting about this beautiful old bakery storefront is that the bakery is no longer in the Dapolito family and has changed ownership several times since the article cited above was written. However, it is currently still operating as a bakery and the owners have kept the storefront intact. 

 Last year, an article was making the rounds on local lower Manhattan blogs about a recent trend that involves new shop owners paying homage to the history of a neighborhood via their store facades. The article is called: In Which We Mark Graves Like Birthplaces . It calls this process authentrification. I love the term but it’s a term that definitely stirs up conflict. This process of authentrification has been happening quite a bit in lower Manhattan and the article does cite Vesuvio Bakery as being an example of this process.  

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View this photo larger and on black on my Google Plus page

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Buy “Vesuvio Bakery - Soho - New York City” Prints here, email me, or ask for help.

Vesuvio Bakery. Soho. New York City

This is one of my favorite storefronts in Soho. A little over 90 years old, Vesuvio Bakery still looks as it did for decades. A tiny bit about the original owners of the bakery is found in a newspaper article from 2003 :

“Dapolito, 83, worked as a boy in the bakery on Prince St., decades before the neighborhood came to be known as Soho. His father and mother, Nunzio and Jennie, immigrants from Naples, opened it in 1920 and Tony went on to own it after they died.” - Source

What is interesting about this beautiful old bakery storefront is that the bakery is no longer in the Dapolito family and has changed ownership several times since the article cited above was written. However, it is currently still operating as a bakery and the owners have kept the storefront intact.

Last year, an article was making the rounds on local lower Manhattan blogs about a recent trend that involves new shop owners paying homage to the history of a neighborhood via their store facades. The article is called: In Which We Mark Graves Like Birthplaces . It calls this process authentrification. I love the term but it’s a term that definitely stirs up conflict. This process of authentrification has been happening quite a bit in lower Manhattan and the article does cite Vesuvio Bakery as being an example of this process.

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View this photo larger and on black on my Google Plus page

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Buy “Vesuvio Bakery - Soho - New York City” Prints here, email me, or ask for help.

Looking through the arches of the Municipal Building. 1 Centre Street. New York City.

We move slowly towards the light over the cobblestones that the weary feet of all those who have passed over these same paths have passed before us. 

And through the archways and doors that sit in our immediate view, the city opens up like so many opportunities that sit every so slightly out of our reach.

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This photo was taken with my phone. I am @newyorklens on Instagram (view my feed here).  Check out my other Instagram posts made to this blog here. You can check out all of my Instagram photos on Flickr here. Additionally, you can view my phone photography for sale here.

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View this photo larger and on black on my Google Plus page


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Buy “Out from Shadows - Manhattan Municipal Building - New York City” Prints here, My mobile photography for sale here, My regular photography for sale here, email me, or ask for help.

Looking through the arches of the Municipal Building. 1 Centre Street. New York City.

We move slowly towards the light over the cobblestones that the weary feet of all those who have passed over these same paths have passed before us.

And through the archways and doors that sit in our immediate view, the city opens up like so many opportunities that sit every so slightly out of our reach.

—-

This photo was taken with my phone. I am @newyorklens on Instagram (view my feed here). Check out my other Instagram posts made to this blog here. You can check out all of my Instagram photos on Flickr here. Additionally, you can view my phone photography for sale here.

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View this photo larger and on black on my Google Plus page

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Buy “Out from Shadows - Manhattan Municipal Building - New York City” Prints here, My mobile photography for sale here, My regular photography for sale here, email me, or ask for help.

The Empire State Building and the buildings of historic Little Italy. New York City.

One of my favorite views of the Empire State Building is from a vantage point in lower Manhattan. My breath is momentarily taken away every time I come across the Empire State Building’s spire jutting out in the distance framed by the Little Italy’s architecture. 

Little Italy is a small area in downtown Manhattan. Currently inhabiting a tiny section of Mulberry Street between Broome and Canal Streets the area recalls a rich history of immigration. Many late 19th century and early 20th century tenements still line the streets and what is left of the area emanates a tremendous amount of history. 

Immigrants from Italy first settled in the neighborhood called Five Points in the 1850s, finally spreading north into what is now referred to as Little Italy in the 1880s. The Five Points neighborhood was New York’s original and most notorious slum. Located a few blocks below Canal at Baxter Street the neighborhood teemed with gangs, prostitutes, and criminals. A target for reformers of all stripes and an embarrassment to civic planners, the dark and airless tenements of the Five Points were finally demolished in an early urban renewal effort and in their place rose newer buildings which still stand today (and can be seen in this photo). Little Italy has lately been colonized by Chinatown in its southern parts and its northern reaches now host upscale boutiques, bars and restaurants. The remnants of the original Little Italy can be found around Mulberry Street and Mott Street.

Some interesting film trivia: key scenes from The Godfather were filmed in Little Italy. These include the christening scene, in which Coppola’s family members acted as extras, and the set representing the interior of the Genco Olive Oil company, which was built on the fourth floor of an old loft building at 128 Mott Street, at the corner of Hester Street.

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View this photo larger and on black on my Google Plus page

—-

Buy “The Empire State Building and Little Italy - New York City” Prints here, email me, or ask for help.

The Empire State Building and the buildings of historic Little Italy. New York City.

One of my favorite views of the Empire State Building is from a vantage point in lower Manhattan. My breath is momentarily taken away every time I come across the Empire State Building’s spire jutting out in the distance framed by the Little Italy’s architecture.

Little Italy is a small area in downtown Manhattan. Currently inhabiting a tiny section of Mulberry Street between Broome and Canal Streets the area recalls a rich history of immigration. Many late 19th century and early 20th century tenements still line the streets and what is left of the area emanates a tremendous amount of history.

Immigrants from Italy first settled in the neighborhood called Five Points in the 1850s, finally spreading north into what is now referred to as Little Italy in the 1880s. The Five Points neighborhood was New York’s original and most notorious slum. Located a few blocks below Canal at Baxter Street the neighborhood teemed with gangs, prostitutes, and criminals. A target for reformers of all stripes and an embarrassment to civic planners, the dark and airless tenements of the Five Points were finally demolished in an early urban renewal effort and in their place rose newer buildings which still stand today (and can be seen in this photo). Little Italy has lately been colonized by Chinatown in its southern parts and its northern reaches now host upscale boutiques, bars and restaurants. The remnants of the original Little Italy can be found around Mulberry Street and Mott Street.

Some interesting film trivia: key scenes from The Godfather were filmed in Little Italy. These include the christening scene, in which Coppola’s family members acted as extras, and the set representing the interior of the Genco Olive Oil company, which was built on the fourth floor of an old loft building at 128 Mott Street, at the corner of Hester Street.

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View this photo larger and on black on my Google Plus page

—-

Buy “The Empire State Building and Little Italy - New York City” Prints here, email me, or ask for help.