NY Through the Lens - New York City Photography

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Early Sunday morning on Orchard Street. Lower East Side. New York City.

On cold city mornings, birds pepper the bone-white sky with movement. 

And through the haze left over by clouds caught in the scuffle between autumn and winter, the wind rushes through the streets like the ghosts of yesterday’s thoughts.


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Buy “Sunday Morning on Orchard Street - Lower East Side - New York City” Posters and Prints here, email me, or ask for help.

Early Sunday morning on Orchard Street. Lower East Side. New York City.

On cold city mornings, birds pepper the bone-white sky with movement.

And through the haze left over by clouds caught in the scuffle between autumn and winter, the wind rushes through the streets like the ghosts of yesterday’s thoughts.

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View this photo larger and on black on my Google Plus page

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Buy “Sunday Morning on Orchard Street - Lower East Side - New York City” Posters and Prints here, email me, or ask for help.

Broadway buildings in the sun. Soho, New York City.

When I was younger, I thought that the fire escapes on this part of Broadway were staircases that led right up to the sky: modern-day beanstalks for all urban Jacks (of Jack and the Beanstalk). It was as if there was a whole other city up there in the blinding sunlight only accessible to those clever enough to climb up the stairs.

I still like to imagine that this is the case.

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View this photo larger and on black on my Google Plus page

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Buy “Stairways to the Sky - Broadway Buildings - Soho - New York City” Prints here, email me, or ask for help.

Broadway buildings in the sun. Soho, New York City.

When I was younger, I thought that the fire escapes on this part of Broadway were staircases that led right up to the sky: modern-day beanstalks for all urban Jacks (of Jack and the Beanstalk). It was as if there was a whole other city up there in the blinding sunlight only accessible to those clever enough to climb up the stairs.

I still like to imagine that this is the case.

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View this photo larger and on black on my Google Plus page

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Buy “Stairways to the Sky - Broadway Buildings - Soho - New York City” Prints here, email me, or ask for help.

Doyers Street. Chinatown, New York City.

Out of the way streets tell a wealth of tales. The bright afternoon sun beats down on old decaying walls and fire escapes creating elongated shadows that seem to stretch indefinitely. If the well-worn awnings could talk, just think of the secrets they would reveal.

This particular photo is of Doyers Street, one of my favorite out of the way streets. It is a winding street that curves around and is tucked away from its hectic surroundings. The street is only about 200 feet long and runs from Pell Street to Chatham Square. It’s home to very old tenements and long-standing businesses like The Nom Wah Tea Parlor which opened in 1927. 

In the early 20th century the curve in the street was known as “the Bloody Angle” because of a plethora of violent acts carried out by Chinatown gangs. The expression ‘hatchet man’ is said to have come from this era and these violent acts which often included hatchets. While the street is not bloody or violent today, it’s worth a visit to soak in the history, vibe and incredible scenery.

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View this photo larger and on black on my Google Plus page


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View “Wealth of Tales - Doyers Street - Chinatown - New York City” in my photography portfolio here, email me, or ask for help.

Doyers Street. Chinatown, New York City.

Out of the way streets tell a wealth of tales. The bright afternoon sun beats down on old decaying walls and fire escapes creating elongated shadows that seem to stretch indefinitely. If the well-worn awnings could talk, just think of the secrets they would reveal.

This particular photo is of Doyers Street, one of my favorite out of the way streets. It is a winding street that curves around and is tucked away from its hectic surroundings. The street is only about 200 feet long and runs from Pell Street to Chatham Square. It’s home to very old tenements and long-standing businesses like The Nom Wah Tea Parlor which opened in 1927.

In the early 20th century the curve in the street was known as “the Bloody Angle” because of a plethora of violent acts carried out by Chinatown gangs. The expression ‘hatchet man’ is said to have come from this era and these violent acts which often included hatchets. While the street is not bloody or violent today, it’s worth a visit to soak in the history, vibe and incredible scenery.

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View this photo larger and on black on my Google Plus page

—-

View “Wealth of Tales - Doyers Street - Chinatown - New York City” in my photography portfolio here, email me, or ask for help.

Japanese Magnolia Blossoms. Spring. Stuyvesant Square, New York City.

As the steel exoskeletons that wind along city buildings bask in the glow of springtime, fresh-faced blossoms blush in the warmth of the sun tilting their heads skyward hoping for a kiss.

And the earth swoons.

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Spring definitely ‘sprung’ in New York City this past weekend. Trees are already blooming nearly a month ahead of schedule which is unusual but also beautiful to witness after what seemed like a long and rather dreary winter. 

These are some of my favorite spring blooms. They are Magnolia Liliiflora also known as Japanese Magnolia. The tree is actually native to China, but was also cultivated for centuries in Japan. It was introduced to English-speaking countries from Japan and so the name of Japanese Magnolia has stuck even though the tree is not technically native to Japan.

I love how lush the blossoms are when they first open. They are quite delicate though and don’t last for very long so it’s a special and rare treat to catch them when they first bloom.

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View this photo larger and on black on my Google Plus page

—-

Buy “Blush Response - Japanese Magnolia Blossoms - Spring - New York City” Prints here, email me, or ask for help.

Japanese Magnolia Blossoms. Spring. Stuyvesant Square, New York City.

As the steel exoskeletons that wind along city buildings bask in the glow of springtime, fresh-faced blossoms blush in the warmth of the sun tilting their heads skyward hoping for a kiss.

And the earth swoons.

—-

Spring definitely ‘sprung’ in New York City this past weekend. Trees are already blooming nearly a month ahead of schedule which is unusual but also beautiful to witness after what seemed like a long and rather dreary winter.

These are some of my favorite spring blooms. They are Magnolia Liliiflora also known as Japanese Magnolia. The tree is actually native to China, but was also cultivated for centuries in Japan. It was introduced to English-speaking countries from Japan and so the name of Japanese Magnolia has stuck even though the tree is not technically native to Japan.

I love how lush the blossoms are when they first open. They are quite delicate though and don’t last for very long so it’s a special and rare treat to catch them when they first bloom.

—-

View this photo larger and on black on my Google Plus page

—-

Buy “Blush Response - Japanese Magnolia Blossoms - Spring - New York City” Prints here, email me, or ask for help.