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Central Park winter - Poet’s Walk in the snow. New York City.

I love heavy snowfall and I found myself braving the super high wind gusts to wander around a mostly empty Central park during one particularly rambunctious blizzard. I don’t really recommend it and thinking back, it was a bit risky considering that the wind gusts were around 55 mph and higher. Wind gusts and trees don’t make for the safest of combinations. However, I have never seen Central Park in such a serene state.

The only people who were in the park that day were small amounts of people who lived in the surrounding neighborhoods, brave tourists and intrepid photographers with giddy expressions on their faces. I could probably count on both hands the number of people I encountered and I ended up covering most of the park on foot that day (I was never so happy to get home and drink hot chocolate that evening).

This part of Central Park is known as The Poet’s Walk or Literary Walk. The reason why this part of the park is known as Poet’s Walk and/or Literary Walk is because at the very end of this section, several statues of famous writers line the path. It’s at the southern end of a section called The Mall.

The Mall is only straight line in Central Park and the trees that line it are its crowning and most distinctive feature. They are American elm trees and are the largest and last remaining stands in all of North America. Over the years, other large grouping of American Elm trees have been destroyed by Dutch Elm disease but Central Park’s conservancy has saved a majority of the remaining trees in the park despite losing around 40 trees in the last few years to this contagious fungus. The recent Hurricane (Superstorm Sandy) also directly impacted the amount of elm trees in Central Park in a negative way.

The Poet’s Walk is one of my favorite spots in the autumn and winter because the trees look their most graceful and beautiful during these seasons. The leaves turn a beautiful golden yellow in the autumn and the elegant branches seem to reach out to each other when covered by freshly fallen snow in the winter.


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Buy “Serenity - Central Park Winter - Poet’s Walk - New York City” Posters and Prints here, email me, or ask for help.

Central Park winter - Poet’s Walk in the snow. New York City.

I love heavy snowfall and I found myself braving the super high wind gusts to wander around a mostly empty Central park during one particularly rambunctious blizzard. I don’t really recommend it and thinking back, it was a bit risky considering that the wind gusts were around 55 mph and higher. Wind gusts and trees don’t make for the safest of combinations. However, I have never seen Central Park in such a serene state.

The only people who were in the park that day were small amounts of people who lived in the surrounding neighborhoods, brave tourists and intrepid photographers with giddy expressions on their faces. I could probably count on both hands the number of people I encountered and I ended up covering most of the park on foot that day (I was never so happy to get home and drink hot chocolate that evening).

This part of Central Park is known as The Poet’s Walk or Literary Walk. The reason why this part of the park is known as Poet’s Walk and/or Literary Walk is because at the very end of this section, several statues of famous writers line the path. It’s at the southern end of a section called The Mall.

The Mall is only straight line in Central Park and the trees that line it are its crowning and most distinctive feature. They are American elm trees and are the largest and last remaining stands in all of North America. Over the years, other large grouping of American Elm trees have been destroyed by Dutch Elm disease but Central Park’s conservancy has saved a majority of the remaining trees in the park despite losing around 40 trees in the last few years to this contagious fungus. The recent Hurricane (Superstorm Sandy) also directly impacted the amount of elm trees in Central Park in a negative way.

The Poet’s Walk is one of my favorite spots in the autumn and winter because the trees look their most graceful and beautiful during these seasons. The leaves turn a beautiful golden yellow in the autumn and the elegant branches seem to reach out to each other when covered by freshly fallen snow in the winter.

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View this photo larger and on black on my Google Plus page

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Buy “Serenity - Central Park Winter - Poet’s Walk - New York City” Posters and Prints here, email me, or ask for help.

The Central Park Mall in winter. Central Park, New York City

New York City is still in the middle of a heat wave. Photos from the dead of winter seem especially dreamlike when the weather is in the triple digits. This particular photo was taken the same day that I took this photo which I posted recently.

The colorful umbrella in the middle of this image is being held by a man who I did not know but who stood in that same position for almost 5 minutes. The wind was gusting very hard and so I think he was waiting for the wind gusts to settle down and chose to wait it out by using his colorful umbrella as a shield while he stood with his back to the wind. 

This section of Central Park is known as The Mall. “When the Park was designed 150 years ago, the Mall was a place for park visitors to parade in their Sunday best. Today you might see visitors in jeans, jogging and exercise outfits, but it’s still the place to see and be seen.

The Mall is the only straight line in the Park and is Central Park’s most important horticultural feature.  The main attractions are the American elm trees. They form a cathedral-like canopy above the Park’s widest pedestrian pathway. These elms are one of the largest and last remaining stands in North America. Source

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View this photo larger and on black on my Google Plus page

—-

Buy “Central Park Mall in Winter”
Posters and Prints here, email me, or ask for help.

The Central Park Mall in winter. Central Park, New York City

New York City is still in the middle of a heat wave. Photos from the dead of winter seem especially dreamlike when the weather is in the triple digits. This particular photo was taken the same day that I took this photo which I posted recently.

The colorful umbrella in the middle of this image is being held by a man who I did not know but who stood in that same position for almost 5 minutes. The wind was gusting very hard and so I think he was waiting for the wind gusts to settle down and chose to wait it out by using his colorful umbrella as a shield while he stood with his back to the wind.

This section of Central Park is known as The Mall. “When the Park was designed 150 years ago, the Mall was a place for park visitors to parade in their Sunday best. Today you might see visitors in jeans, jogging and exercise outfits, but it’s still the place to see and be seen.

The Mall is the only straight line in the Park and is Central Park’s most important horticultural feature. The main attractions are the American elm trees. They form a cathedral-like canopy above the Park’s widest pedestrian pathway. These elms are one of the largest and last remaining stands in North America. Source

—-

View this photo larger and on black on my Google Plus page

—-

Buy “Central Park Mall in Winter” Posters and Prints here, email me, or ask for help.