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New York Autumn - East Village - Alphabet City


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Autumn clung to the city:

fingertips 

red from the heat 

of a flame

that couldn’t  

be contained.

And the city rose

out of this

fiery embrace:

a phoenix

clinging to the earth

as winter

waiting on the broad arms 

of extinguishing winds

looked on.


—- 

Late autumn is full of tension of a kind that only rears its head once a year. It’s the vivid last breath that nature takes before winter spends a long time making itself comfortable in the city. This was taken earlier this morning with the Sony QX100 and my iPhone.

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View:  “New York Autumn - East Village” in my photography portfolio here, Gear List, Travel Blog, On G+, email me, or ask for help.

New York Autumn - East Village - Alphabet City

—-

Autumn clung to the city:

fingertips

red from the heat

of a flame

that couldn’t

be contained.

And the city rose

out of this

fiery embrace:

a phoenix

clinging to the earth

as winter

waiting on the broad arms

of extinguishing winds

looked on.

—-

Late autumn is full of tension of a kind that only rears its head once a year. It’s the vivid last breath that nature takes before winter spends a long time making itself comfortable in the city. This was taken earlier this morning with the Sony QX100 and my iPhone.

—-

View: “New York Autumn - East Village” in my photography portfolio here, Gear List, Travel Blog, On G+, email me, or ask for help.

Halloween Dog Parade 2011. Tompkins Square Park. East Village, New York City.

I attended what is quite possibly my favorite annual event in my neighborhood, the Halloween Dog Parade 2011. It has taken place every year for the last 21 years in Tompkins Square Park which is located in the East Village. Dog lovers from everywhere dress their dogs up to compete for various prizes. The costumes were awesome as usual. In terms of topical costumes, there were a few Occupy Wall Street dog costumes.

My face hurts from smiling so much because it’s impossible not to smile since the level of cute is so high it is off the charts!

If you would like to see all the photos I have (which are over 100!), feel free to go through the album on my Flickr:

Halloween Dog Parade 2011 Flickr Set

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Alternatively, as I always do, this post is cross-posted to Google Plus where you can view the full album of photos large and on black over there:

Halloween Dog Parade 2011 on Google Plus

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View my store, email me, ask for help, or subscribe to the mailing list.

Street corner and ode to Bob Arihood. Alphabet City. East Village, New York City.

Autumn weekends are draped in a chilled warmth down in the East Village and on the Lower East Side. Trees hang their colorful limbs lazily over the multitudes of people who unwrap their weekend day slowly and casually. The East Village has changed so much over the last few decades but sometimes on days like this one glimpses of its charm radiate so brightly that it is almost impossible not to smile.

Yesterday, one of the East Village’s (and really New York City’s) most brilliant photographers died. His name was Bob Arihood. He was the last of a dying breed.. He covered the not-so-pretty side of the East Village taking great care to carefully document the colorful personalities who made up the mosaic of the East Village over the years. A few years back he was profiled in the NY Times: An East Village Blogger Hangs Up His Mouse and he maintained two blogs: Nadie Se Conoce and Neither More Nor Less. 

I had the pleasure of meeting him for the very first time after being a long time admirer of his work at a burlesque birthday party for Ray, the owner of Ray’s Candy Store in the East Village last winter. I will never forget the first five minutes of conversation with him. He asked me where I grew up in New York City and I said “Queens!” and he looked at me, smiled wryly and said “Oh, Queens. They have an entirely different currency in those parts.” We both laughed and talked about cameras, the changing face of the East Village and his work. After that, I ran into him quite a few times in and around Tompkins Square Park, at Ray’s Candy Store and on East fourth street. He was always kind, always had time to talk, was an incredible listener and had the biggest heart of anyone I have known. His humility was one of his most stunning characteristics. In fact, he was almost embarrassed that he had made it into the NY Times.

The last time I saw him and spoke to him was at the beginning of summer. It was a bittersweet conversation. He spoke to me about wanting to find a way to convert footage he had of the East Village in the early 1970s to a format that would be viewable online and he said something that has been haunting me ever since I found out that he passed away yesterday. 

We were talking about how he managed to get the incredible photos of people that he had captured over the years and he spoke about being an admirer of Arthur Fellig (Weegee) for many years and that he had spent years befriending and getting close with many of the gangs, vagrants and fringe element in the East Village just so that they would be comfortable enough to let him into their circles and photograph them. That was what made him so unique. He had a distinct compassion for those who society often overlooks. He would sometimes take in the junkies, homeless and other lost souls who populated the East Village and give them food and the ability to take a warm shower. Sometimes he would listen to police radio to try to assess if anyone he knew from those circles were freshly involved in altercations (ala Weegee). 

He spoke with sadness about not being fast enough to catch these things due to his increasingly poor health and how he was considering a car at some point. It was then that he leaned in and said softly to me “It feels like life is passing me by.” Something about that moment struck me with incredible sadness. I put my hand on his shoulder and just nodded because sometimes words just aren’t enough. 

Whenever I spoke about him I would tell people that he was one of the people who deserved a documentary. I still feel that way. He was and remains a legend. It’s hard to believe he is gone but he will never be forgotten.

You can view the announcement of his passing as well as a beautiful write-up of him here on (only) one of the East Village’s best blogs: RIP Bob Arihood 


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—-

Buy “Autumn in Alphabet City” Prints and Posters here, View my store, email me, or ask for help.

Street corner and ode to Bob Arihood. Alphabet City. East Village, New York City.

Autumn weekends are draped in a chilled warmth down in the East Village and on the Lower East Side. Trees hang their colorful limbs lazily over the multitudes of people who unwrap their weekend day slowly and casually. The East Village has changed so much over the last few decades but sometimes on days like this one glimpses of its charm radiate so brightly that it is almost impossible not to smile.

Yesterday, one of the East Village’s (and really New York City’s) most brilliant photographers died. His name was Bob Arihood. He was the last of a dying breed.. He covered the not-so-pretty side of the East Village taking great care to carefully document the colorful personalities who made up the mosaic of the East Village over the years. A few years back he was profiled in the NY Times: An East Village Blogger Hangs Up His Mouse and he maintained two blogs: Nadie Se Conoce and Neither More Nor Less.

I had the pleasure of meeting him for the very first time after being a long time admirer of his work at a burlesque birthday party for Ray, the owner of Ray’s Candy Store in the East Village last winter. I will never forget the first five minutes of conversation with him. He asked me where I grew up in New York City and I said “Queens!” and he looked at me, smiled wryly and said “Oh, Queens. They have an entirely different currency in those parts.” We both laughed and talked about cameras, the changing face of the East Village and his work. After that, I ran into him quite a few times in and around Tompkins Square Park, at Ray’s Candy Store and on East fourth street. He was always kind, always had time to talk, was an incredible listener and had the biggest heart of anyone I have known. His humility was one of his most stunning characteristics. In fact, he was almost embarrassed that he had made it into the NY Times.

The last time I saw him and spoke to him was at the beginning of summer. It was a bittersweet conversation. He spoke to me about wanting to find a way to convert footage he had of the East Village in the early 1970s to a format that would be viewable online and he said something that has been haunting me ever since I found out that he passed away yesterday.

We were talking about how he managed to get the incredible photos of people that he had captured over the years and he spoke about being an admirer of Arthur Fellig (Weegee) for many years and that he had spent years befriending and getting close with many of the gangs, vagrants and fringe element in the East Village just so that they would be comfortable enough to let him into their circles and photograph them. That was what made him so unique. He had a distinct compassion for those who society often overlooks. He would sometimes take in the junkies, homeless and other lost souls who populated the East Village and give them food and the ability to take a warm shower. Sometimes he would listen to police radio to try to assess if anyone he knew from those circles were freshly involved in altercations (ala Weegee).

He spoke with sadness about not being fast enough to catch these things due to his increasingly poor health and how he was considering a car at some point. It was then that he leaned in and said softly to me “It feels like life is passing me by.” Something about that moment struck me with incredible sadness. I put my hand on his shoulder and just nodded because sometimes words just aren’t enough.

Whenever I spoke about him I would tell people that he was one of the people who deserved a documentary. I still feel that way. He was and remains a legend. It’s hard to believe he is gone but he will never be forgotten.

You can view the announcement of his passing as well as a beautiful write-up of him here on (only) one of the East Village’s best blogs: RIP Bob Arihood

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Buy “Autumn in Alphabet City” Prints and Posters here, View my store, email me, or ask for help.

The Creative Little Garden. Alphabet City. East Village, New York City.

The community gardens of the East Village and Lower East Side are some of my favorite little spots in Manhattan. This particular garden is called The Creative Little Garden and it is located in Alphabet City in the East Village.  

 The Creative Little Garden started out as a tenement building in the early part of the 20th century. Many buildings that occupied the same block became abandoned in the 1950s and 1960s and in the early 1970s, the building that occupied the site where this lovely garden sits today was demolished. In 1982, the Creative Little Garden was created and it has been serving the community ever since.

View this photo larger and on black on my Google Plus page


Buy “The Creative Little Garden”
Posters and Prints here, View my store, email me, or ask for help.

The Creative Little Garden. Alphabet City. East Village, New York City.

The community gardens of the East Village and Lower East Side are some of my favorite little spots in Manhattan. This particular garden is called The Creative Little Garden and it is located in Alphabet City in the East Village.

The Creative Little Garden started out as a tenement building in the early part of the 20th century. Many buildings that occupied the same block became abandoned in the 1950s and 1960s and in the early 1970s, the building that occupied the site where this lovely garden sits today was demolished. In 1982, the Creative Little Garden was created and it has been serving the community ever since.

View this photo larger and on black on my Google Plus page

Buy “The Creative Little Garden” Posters and Prints here, View my store, email me, or ask for help.