NY Through the Lens - New York City Photography

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New York Winter. 5th Avenue in the snow. Midtown.This is one of my favorite scenes from last Friday night’s snowstorm. Quite a few people asked me how I was able to take photos without having snow and water droplets on my camera lens. It was quite a production actually. As I explained in my initial post, I wrapped my camera lens in plastic and then poked a hole in a plastic bag and threaded the lens through that hole. The rest of the plastic bag went over the camera as a covering. I secured the plastic with a lens hood which came in handy during periods of blowing snow. When I wasn’t taking a photo I would point the camera down lens to the ground so that when snow blew towards me, it would blow and collect on the outside of the lens hood keeping the lens relatively dry and clean. I also had a lens filter on the lens.This meant that I only had a tiny amount of time to shoot each shot. I shoot in manual mode because it’s a long-standing preference of mine so I already had set up the settings that worked for the majority of shots (I did have to adjust a lot once I got to the Times Square area due to the lighting there). In the event that there was a shot I wanted to go for that was in the direction of blowing snow, I would just quickly take the shot and then scurry towards an awning, scaffolding cover, or dry entrance where I would wipe the lens down with a lens wipe. I finally got around to putting some of the more popular photos from my winter storm Nemo in NYC set that I took and shared this past weekend during the (non) blizzard in my main portfolio and store. They are scattered throughout the rest of my photos. A number of people asked when I was going to put them up for sale so I have been slowly putting the photos from the set into my portfolio - store. I actually have more photos that I haven’t even touched from that night that I hope to go through in the next few weeks and eventually share.I really didn’t expect the response I got for the photo set over on Flickr! Over the weekend, my Flickr was viewed 175,000 times and the winter storm Nemo photoset (in its entirety) has been viewed nearly 30,000 times (with each photo being viewed anywhere from 900 to over 4000 times). Over on G+, the main photo that I shared has been viewed 189,000 times. Craziness! Thanks all for all of the awesome messages, comments, shares and love for New York City in the snow :).—-View this photo with a comment thread on my Google Plus page—-Buy “New York Winter Night - Midtown in the Snow” Posters and Prints here, email me, or ask for help.

New York Winter. 5th Avenue in the snow. Midtown.


This is one of my favorite scenes from last Friday night’s snowstorm. Quite a few people asked me how I was able to take photos without having snow and water droplets on my camera lens. It was quite a production actually. As I explained in my initial post, I wrapped my camera lens in plastic and then poked a hole in a plastic bag and threaded the lens through that hole. The rest of the plastic bag went over the camera as a covering. I secured the plastic with a lens hood which came in handy during periods of blowing snow. When I wasn’t taking a photo I would point the camera down lens to the ground so that when snow blew towards me, it would blow and collect on the outside of the lens hood keeping the lens relatively dry and clean. I also had a lens filter on the lens.


This meant that I only had a tiny amount of time to shoot each shot. I shoot in manual mode because it’s a long-standing preference of mine so I already had set up the settings that worked for the majority of shots (I did have to adjust a lot once I got to the Times Square area due to the lighting there). In the event that there was a shot I wanted to go for that was in the direction of blowing snow, I would just quickly take the shot and then scurry towards an awning, scaffolding cover, or dry entrance where I would wipe the lens down with a lens wipe.


I finally got around to putting some of the more popular photos from my winter storm Nemo in NYC set that I took and shared this past weekend during the (non) blizzard in my main portfolio and store. They are scattered throughout the rest of my photos. A number of people asked when I was going to put them up for sale so I have been slowly putting the photos from the set into my portfolio - store. I actually have more photos that I haven’t even touched from that night that I hope to go through in the next few weeks and eventually share.


I really didn’t expect the response I got for the photo set over on Flickr! Over the weekend, my Flickr was viewed 175,000 times and the winter storm Nemo photoset (in its entirety) has been viewed nearly 30,000 times (with each photo being viewed anywhere from 900 to over 4000 times). Over on G+, the main photo that I shared has been viewed 189,000 times. Craziness! Thanks all for all of the awesome messages, comments, shares and love for New York City in the snow :).


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View this photo with a comment thread on my Google Plus page


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Buy “New York Winter Night - Midtown in the Snow” Posters and Prints here, email me, or ask for help.

New York City in the rain. Flatiron District, Midtown.

There is an inherent romance that buzzes through the air in New York City when it rains. 

The Flatiron District is one of my favorite areas in Manhattan when it rains. The street (5th Avenue) opens up to reveal distant skyscrapers that disappear into heavy fog as people weave their way through the multitudes of umbrellas. 

The clock in this image is the Fifth Avenue Building Clock (a close-up image and its history is in this post) which is a New York City landmark and recalls another era: one where these ornamental clocks played a role in attracting people to gilded era storefronts. This vantage point is with the Flatiron Building directly in back of the viewer looking up 5th Avenue.


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I have had quite a few requests that I add some of my New York City mobile photography to my online store and portfolio since people are looking to buy holiday gifts. This is the first of one of those requests. It was taken with my phone and has been lovingly added (link below!).




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View this photo larger and on black on my Google Plus page

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Buy “New York City - Rain” Prints here, email me, or ask for help.

New York City in the rain. Flatiron District, Midtown.

There is an inherent romance that buzzes through the air in New York City when it rains.

The Flatiron District is one of my favorite areas in Manhattan when it rains. The street (5th Avenue) opens up to reveal distant skyscrapers that disappear into heavy fog as people weave their way through the multitudes of umbrellas.

The clock in this image is the Fifth Avenue Building Clock (a close-up image and its history is in this post) which is a New York City landmark and recalls another era: one where these ornamental clocks played a role in attracting people to gilded era storefronts. This vantage point is with the Flatiron Building directly in back of the viewer looking up 5th Avenue.

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I have had quite a few requests that I add some of my New York City mobile photography to my online store and portfolio since people are looking to buy holiday gifts. This is the first of one of those requests. It was taken with my phone and has been lovingly added (link below!).

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View this photo larger and on black on my Google Plus page

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Buy “New York City - Rain” Prints here, email me, or ask for help.

The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum designed by Frank Lloyd Wright. Upper East Side. New York City.

Sometimes the simplicity of a scene is enough to render one speechless before realizing that the perceived simplicity is complex in its own right.

The curves of architecture suggesting a softness usually relegated to flesh against a bone white sky, for example.

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The architectural design in this photo is the work of Frank Lloyd Wright and is the top of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum. Wright was commissioned to design a space for the museum in 1943 and the project took well over a decade to complete. He apparently was disappointed in the choice of New York City as the home of the building as he thought that New York City was overbuilt and overpopulated. However, he complied with the wishes of the client and the Guggenheim was set to be built next to Central Park as possible to keep it as close to nature as possible. It is located on the Upper East Side on 5th Avenue between 88th and 89th Streets across from Central Park.

According to the Guggenheim’s site: “Nature not only provided the museum with a respite from New York’s distractions but also leant it inspiration. The Guggenheim Museum is an embodiment of Wright’s attempts to render the inherent plasticity of organic forms in architecture. 

His inverted ziggurat (a stepped or winding pyramidal temple of Babylonian origin) dispensed with the conventional approach to museum design, which led visitors through a series of interconnected rooms and forced them to retrace their steps when exiting. Instead, Wright whisked people to the top of the building via elevator, and led them downward at a leisurely pace on the gentle slope of a continuous ramp. The galleries were divided like the membranes in citrus fruit, with self-contained yet interdependent sections. The open rotunda afforded viewers the unique possibility of seeing several bays of work on different levels simultaneously. The spiral design recalled a nautilus shell, with continuous spaces flowing freely one into another.”

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If you didn’t see my initial contest entry post for the current Artists Wanted photography contest, you can still help me out by going to my contest entry page and clicking collect me

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View this photo larger and on black on my Google Plus page


—-

Buy “The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum - New York City” Prints here, email me, or ask for help.

The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum designed by Frank Lloyd Wright. Upper East Side. New York City.

Sometimes the simplicity of a scene is enough to render one speechless before realizing that the perceived simplicity is complex in its own right.

The curves of architecture suggesting a softness usually relegated to flesh against a bone white sky, for example.

—-

The architectural design in this photo is the work of Frank Lloyd Wright and is the top of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum. Wright was commissioned to design a space for the museum in 1943 and the project took well over a decade to complete. He apparently was disappointed in the choice of New York City as the home of the building as he thought that New York City was overbuilt and overpopulated. However, he complied with the wishes of the client and the Guggenheim was set to be built next to Central Park as possible to keep it as close to nature as possible. It is located on the Upper East Side on 5th Avenue between 88th and 89th Streets across from Central Park.

According to the Guggenheim’s site: “Nature not only provided the museum with a respite from New York’s distractions but also leant it inspiration. The Guggenheim Museum is an embodiment of Wright’s attempts to render the inherent plasticity of organic forms in architecture.

His inverted ziggurat (a stepped or winding pyramidal temple of Babylonian origin) dispensed with the conventional approach to museum design, which led visitors through a series of interconnected rooms and forced them to retrace their steps when exiting. Instead, Wright whisked people to the top of the building via elevator, and led them downward at a leisurely pace on the gentle slope of a continuous ramp. The galleries were divided like the membranes in citrus fruit, with self-contained yet interdependent sections. The open rotunda afforded viewers the unique possibility of seeing several bays of work on different levels simultaneously. The spiral design recalled a nautilus shell, with continuous spaces flowing freely one into another.”

—-

If you didn’t see my initial contest entry post for the current Artists Wanted photography contest, you can still help me out by going to my contest entry page and clicking collect me

—-

View this photo larger and on black on my Google Plus page

—-

Buy “The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum - New York City” Prints here, email me, or ask for help.