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Black eyed Susans (yellow flowers) at night. Washington Square Park. Greeenwich Village, New York City,

There is a dramatic quality to fragile petals illuminated by only the faint glow of a nearby street lamp. This particular photo is of a solitary Black Eyed Susan in Washington Square Park. I am quite fond of this particular patch of yellow flowers during the day but they are especially gorgeous late at night.   

Rudbeckia hirta, the Black-eyed Susan, with the other common names of: Brown-eyed Susan, Blackiehead, Brown Betty,Yellow Daisy, and Yellow Ox-eye Daisy is a flowering plant in the family Asteraceae. It is an upright annual (sometimes biennial or perennial) native to most of North America, and is one of a number of plants with the common name Black-eyed Susan with flowers having dark purplish brown centers. Black-eyed Susans can be established, like most other wildflowers, simply by spreading seeds throughout a designated area. They are able to reseed themselves after the first season. Source 



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View this photo larger and on black on my Google Plus page

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Buy “Night Bloom” Posters and Prints here, View my store, email me, or ask for help.

Black eyed Susans (yellow flowers) at night. Washington Square Park. Greeenwich Village, New York City,

There is a dramatic quality to fragile petals illuminated by only the faint glow of a nearby street lamp. This particular photo is of a solitary Black Eyed Susan in Washington Square Park. I am quite fond of this particular patch of yellow flowers during the day but they are especially gorgeous late at night.

Rudbeckia hirta, the Black-eyed Susan, with the other common names of: Brown-eyed Susan, Blackiehead, Brown Betty,Yellow Daisy, and Yellow Ox-eye Daisy is a flowering plant in the family Asteraceae. It is an upright annual (sometimes biennial or perennial) native to most of North America, and is one of a number of plants with the common name Black-eyed Susan with flowers having dark purplish brown centers. Black-eyed Susans can be established, like most other wildflowers, simply by spreading seeds throughout a designated area. They are able to reseed themselves after the first season. Source

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View this photo larger and on black on my Google Plus page

—-

Buy “Night Bloom” Posters and Prints here, View my store, email me, or ask for help.

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