NY Through the Lens - New York City Photography

Scroll to Info & Navigation

Paris - Streets

—-

It’s these city streets,

the ones that press on

the backs of eyelids

at night,

persisting and passing

through the cobwebs

of memories

that are spun

like fairy floss

across dreamscapes

where every

passing stranger

tells tales

that skip beats

of a heart

hung on

every bit of

concrete, steel,

and paint.

—-

How people interact with their environment has always intrigued me. I have a tendency to view life as an elaborate film. Every cityscape, street, and landscape forms a backdrop in a scene that unfolds before my eyes. When I was a child, I used to tell people that every time I blinked another scene started. And in a lot of ways, this has carried over into my photography and writing. I craft elaborate narratives in split seconds of the people who are populating any given scene and moment.

Paris is probably one of the most intriguing cities when it comes to observing people against the city’s backdrop. The city itself is a complex set of characters. The days I spent there were mostly cloudy and ominous which was fascinating. I think there is a tendency to romanticize Paris as a city of sun in terms of kitschy Paris photos that seem to populate Pinterest full of lush blossoms and never-ending sunny days. But the reality (at least while I was there) was far more nuanced.

These are just a few photos I took while I walked around Paris of street scenes. Normally I take photos alone. Photography is a very solitary process for me and I tend to be “in my own head” most of the time. However, I was often with either Gael or Hugo from Rendezvous with Paris or (later in the week) also Katherine from Atout France. And, what was strange was that I really enjoyed it. It helped that everyone was a veritable fountain of interesting knowledge and that they all had a super passionate love for Paris. Typically when I shoot when other people are around it negatively influences my photography but it really wasn’t the case while I was in Paris which was awesome. In fact, it was nice to talk quite a bit about all sorts of things while shooting and the icing on the cake was that I learned so much.

—-

Interested in viewing all of my Paris posts so far? Here they are:

Paris Through the Lens

Looking for these (and more) Paris photos to view larger? Here you go (click or tap on each photo to view larger):

Paris

—-

Please check out France Guide on Facebook. If it wasn’t for them, I would not have been in Paris having the experience of a lifetime!

And I also must highly recommend Rendezvous With Paris. They offer passionate tours about specialized subjects as well as tours of different districts of Paris.

—-

View: My photography portfolio, My Gear List, My Travel Blog, On G+,email me, or ask for help.

Paris - The Medici Fountain- Jardin du Luxembourg 

—-
Paris is a heady rush: the feeling you get when the earth drops out from under you when eyes meet and lips turn upwards in unison.

There is a heaviness that is etched in its architecture, a solemnity of the inevitable without any consequence because history lingers like trailed off sentences in tones reserved for late night confessions. 

Paris sweeps you off of your feet: a lover so tragically beautiful on the outside while teeming on the inside with fleeting nostalgia-laced promises of a distant, yet familiar infinite.



—-

This is the Medici Fountain in the Jardin du Luxembourg. It was built by Marie de’ Medici in the 1630s. Marie de’ Medici was the second wife of King Henry the IV of France and the mother of King Louis the XIII of France. She was embroiled in quite a bit of mistress drama with one of Henry’s mistresses, Catherine Henriette de Balzac d’Entragues, Marquise de Verneuil and ended up with a not-so-favorable view in the public eye due to various political intrigue. 

This particular incarnation of the fountain came into being during the 1800s after it underwent a restoration after spending many years in disrepair. The statues in the center represent Polyphemus discovering the lovers Acis and Galatea which was a popular story represented in art throughout the centuries. It’s a tale of love and jealousy. 

I came across this fountain on the last day I was in Paris. It took my breath away as so much did during my 9 day visit but I was already completely in love with Paris at that point. I fell hard within the first few days and it was a never-ending blush on the skin and butterflies in the stomach after that.

I had an interesting conversation on my Twitter earlier today about the differences between Paris and NYC when it comes to initial visual and emotional impact. One of my open-ended conclusions was: “NYC is harder to fall in love with at first sight. Paris sweeps off the feet. NYC woos.” And while I think I need to think about this some more on subsequent returns to Paris, there is some truth there. 

Paris does sweep you off of your feet.

—-



—-

View: My photography portfolio, My Gear List, My Travel Blog, On G+,email me, or ask for help.

Paris - The Medici Fountain- Jardin du Luxembourg

—-

Paris is a heady rush: the feeling you get when the earth drops out from under you when eyes meet and lips turn upwards in unison.

There is a heaviness that is etched in its architecture, a solemnity of the inevitable without any consequence because history lingers like trailed off sentences in tones reserved for late night confessions.

Paris sweeps you off of your feet: a lover so tragically beautiful on the outside while teeming on the inside with fleeting nostalgia-laced promises of a distant, yet familiar infinite.

—-

This is the Medici Fountain in the Jardin du Luxembourg. It was built by Marie de’ Medici in the 1630s. Marie de’ Medici was the second wife of King Henry the IV of France and the mother of King Louis the XIII of France. She was embroiled in quite a bit of mistress drama with one of Henry’s mistresses, Catherine Henriette de Balzac d’Entragues, Marquise de Verneuil and ended up with a not-so-favorable view in the public eye due to various political intrigue.

This particular incarnation of the fountain came into being during the 1800s after it underwent a restoration after spending many years in disrepair. The statues in the center represent Polyphemus discovering the lovers Acis and Galatea which was a popular story represented in art throughout the centuries. It’s a tale of love and jealousy.

I came across this fountain on the last day I was in Paris. It took my breath away as so much did during my 9 day visit but I was already completely in love with Paris at that point. I fell hard within the first few days and it was a never-ending blush on the skin and butterflies in the stomach after that.

I had an interesting conversation on my Twitter earlier today about the differences between Paris and NYC when it comes to initial visual and emotional impact. One of my open-ended conclusions was: “NYC is harder to fall in love with at first sight. Paris sweeps off the feet. NYC woos.” And while I think I need to think about this some more on subsequent returns to Paris, there is some truth there.

Paris does sweep you off of your feet.

—-

—-

View: My photography portfolio, My Gear List, My Travel Blog, On G+,email me, or ask for help.

Paris - A Vieux Paris d’Arcole

—-

I have been back from Paris for a few days now and I am still in the weird twilight phase of jet-lag where I feel like my mind is suspended between sleep and dreaming yet somehow acutely in tune with all of the experiences I had in Paris. Jet-lag seems to work well for me creatively. Who knew? 

Over the last few days I have been preparing my Paris photography for the gallery event at the end of the month. I will be sharing my experiences and photography over the next few weeks. I hope you will enjoy my musings and views of Paris. 

There is so much to write about and share. I stayed in some truly epic hotels with fascinating histories and views and I got to meet some really amazing people. The beauty of travel is that it is something that is enjoyed multiple times: the first time while living through the experiences, and on subsequent occasions when you are able to share your experiences and fill in the memories with color, light, and emotion.  

For now though, here is a photo from one of the first few days I was in Paris. I actually wrote a little bit about this spot in one of my earlier posts while I was in Paris. I ate lunch there with Hugo from Rendezvous with Paris while talking about the history of the area. While the interior is fascinating on many levels, the exterior is quite beautiful.

The name of the restaurant is A Vieux Paris d’Arcole which was built in 1512 after the completion of the Cathedral of Notre Dame de Paris. It is located at 24 Rue Chanoinesse and it even contains some remnants from Notre Dame’s interior. The diocese sold it in the 1700s when it became a wine bar. As one of the oldest restaurants in Paris, it also enjoys an interesting tourist exception in that the Mayor of Paris allows the external floral decorations which adds to its beautiful medieval character. 


—-

Please check out France Guide on Facebook. If it wasn’t for them, I wouldn’t be here taking photos of Paris and having the experience of a lifetime!

And I also must highly recommend Rendezvous With Paris. They offer passionate tours about specialized subjects as well as tours of different districts of Paris. 

—-

View: My photography portfolio, My Gear List, My Travel Blog, On G+,email me, or ask for help.

Paris - A Vieux Paris d’Arcole

—-

I have been back from Paris for a few days now and I am still in the weird twilight phase of jet-lag where I feel like my mind is suspended between sleep and dreaming yet somehow acutely in tune with all of the experiences I had in Paris. Jet-lag seems to work well for me creatively. Who knew?

Over the last few days I have been preparing my Paris photography for the gallery event at the end of the month. I will be sharing my experiences and photography over the next few weeks. I hope you will enjoy my musings and views of Paris.

There is so much to write about and share. I stayed in some truly epic hotels with fascinating histories and views and I got to meet some really amazing people. The beauty of travel is that it is something that is enjoyed multiple times: the first time while living through the experiences, and on subsequent occasions when you are able to share your experiences and fill in the memories with color, light, and emotion.

For now though, here is a photo from one of the first few days I was in Paris. I actually wrote a little bit about this spot in one of my earlier posts while I was in Paris. I ate lunch there with Hugo from Rendezvous with Paris while talking about the history of the area. While the interior is fascinating on many levels, the exterior is quite beautiful.

The name of the restaurant is A Vieux Paris d’Arcole which was built in 1512 after the completion of the Cathedral of Notre Dame de Paris. It is located at 24 Rue Chanoinesse and it even contains some remnants from Notre Dame’s interior. The diocese sold it in the 1700s when it became a wine bar. As one of the oldest restaurants in Paris, it also enjoys an interesting tourist exception in that the Mayor of Paris allows the external floral decorations which adds to its beautiful medieval character.

—-

Please check out France Guide on Facebook. If it wasn’t for them, I wouldn’t be here taking photos of Paris and having the experience of a lifetime!

And I also must highly recommend Rendezvous With Paris. They offer passionate tours about specialized subjects as well as tours of different districts of Paris.

—-

View: My photography portfolio, My Gear List, My Travel Blog, On G+,email me, or ask for help.

France - Vaux le Vicomte, Fountainebleau, Barbizon

—-

This has been a life-altering trip (in a good way) on quite a few levels. So much has happened over the last 4 days that quite literally as I sat on the Metro earlier this evening, my head was swimming.

It’s almost impossible at this point to successfully summarize a few of the days succinctly especially since I am still fighting a rather serious bout of lung issues (due to the smog here in Paris, for which I am now on a slew of medication thanks to France’s excellent healthcare system). Just know that I am currently skipping that story as well as a truly epic day I had yesterday in Montmartre with Hugo and Gael from Rendezvous in Paris. The photos are almost painfully beautiful and we had a great time climbing to the top of Sacre Coeur (sometimes I think I hold onto the beautiful moments longer to savor them).

Instead, I am posting just a tiny slew of photos from the 12 hour day I spent today at Fountainebleu, Barbizon, and Vaux le Vicomte.

1 - This is Vaux le Vicomte. I grew up on a steady diet of history films which were some of my favorite daydream material and have influenced me in so many ways. Vaux le Vicomte has been used in around 70 films including Dangerous Liaisons (one of my favorite movies growing up), Marie Antoinette, Ridicule (another favorite), etc… Quite amazing to see it in person.

2 - …However, seeing it in person was greatly enhanced by getting a private tour by one of the current owners, Count Alexandre de Vogüé. Here we are after I politely suggested that we take a selfie in one of the mirrors at Vaux le Vicomte. :) From left to right: Severine Camblong, Count Alexandre de Vogüé, Me, Katherine Johnstone with Atout France.

In truth, he was absolutely wonderful and one of the friendliest people! He expressed that he liked my photography very much and had seen my photo-blog and was interested in my history which pretty much floored me. What do you say to that? He took us around the chateau and also took us for a ride through the expansive gardens. It was quite incredible. What an amazing experience. I had a great time talking to him about the chateau which has been in his family for quite some time now. I look forward to posting many of the photos I took there today and writing about my experience there when I get back to NYC.

3 - The day actually started at Fountainebleau, France’s largest palace that dates back to the 12th century. I had a fantastic tour of the chateau. This was one of my favorite spots, the Galerie de Diane. I will do a dedicated post about this palace, for sure.

4 - In between Fountainbleau and Vaux le Vicomte, we visited the town of Barbizon which was an art commune in the 1800s and hosted a group of pre-impressionist painters who were in love with the huge forest just outside of town. The town itself is absolutely gorgeous.

—-

Please check out France Guide on Facebook. If it wasn’t for them, I wouldn’t be here taking photos of Paris and its outskirts and having the experience of a lifetime!

—-

View: My photography portfolio, My Gear List, My Travel Blog, On G+,email me, or ask for help.