NY Through the Lens - New York City Photography

Apr 15

[video]

Apr 11

Paris - The Medici Fountain- Jardin du Luxembourg 

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Paris is a heady rush: the feeling you get when the earth drops out from under you when eyes meet and lips turn upwards in unison.

There is a heaviness that is etched in its architecture, a solemnity of the inevitable without any consequence because history lingers like trailed off sentences in tones reserved for late night confessions. 

Paris sweeps you off of your feet: a lover so tragically beautiful on the outside while teeming on the inside with fleeting nostalgia-laced promises of a distant, yet familiar infinite.



—-

This is the Medici Fountain in the Jardin du Luxembourg. It was built by Marie de’ Medici in the 1630s. Marie de’ Medici was the second wife of King Henry the IV of France and the mother of King Louis the XIII of France. She was embroiled in quite a bit of mistress drama with one of Henry’s mistresses, Catherine Henriette de Balzac d’Entragues, Marquise de Verneuil and ended up with a not-so-favorable view in the public eye due to various political intrigue. 

This particular incarnation of the fountain came into being during the 1800s after it underwent a restoration after spending many years in disrepair. The statues in the center represent Polyphemus discovering the lovers Acis and Galatea which was a popular story represented in art throughout the centuries. It’s a tale of love and jealousy. 

I came across this fountain on the last day I was in Paris. It took my breath away as so much did during my 9 day visit but I was already completely in love with Paris at that point. I fell hard within the first few days and it was a never-ending blush on the skin and butterflies in the stomach after that.

I had an interesting conversation on my Twitter earlier today about the differences between Paris and NYC when it comes to initial visual and emotional impact. One of my open-ended conclusions was: “NYC is harder to fall in love with at first sight. Paris sweeps off the feet. NYC woos.” And while I think I need to think about this some more on subsequent returns to Paris, there is some truth there. 

Paris does sweep you off of your feet.

—-



—-

View: My photography portfolio, My Gear List, My Travel Blog, On G+,email me, or ask for help.

Paris - The Medici Fountain- Jardin du Luxembourg

—-

Paris is a heady rush: the feeling you get when the earth drops out from under you when eyes meet and lips turn upwards in unison.

There is a heaviness that is etched in its architecture, a solemnity of the inevitable without any consequence because history lingers like trailed off sentences in tones reserved for late night confessions.

Paris sweeps you off of your feet: a lover so tragically beautiful on the outside while teeming on the inside with fleeting nostalgia-laced promises of a distant, yet familiar infinite.

—-

This is the Medici Fountain in the Jardin du Luxembourg. It was built by Marie de’ Medici in the 1630s. Marie de’ Medici was the second wife of King Henry the IV of France and the mother of King Louis the XIII of France. She was embroiled in quite a bit of mistress drama with one of Henry’s mistresses, Catherine Henriette de Balzac d’Entragues, Marquise de Verneuil and ended up with a not-so-favorable view in the public eye due to various political intrigue.

This particular incarnation of the fountain came into being during the 1800s after it underwent a restoration after spending many years in disrepair. The statues in the center represent Polyphemus discovering the lovers Acis and Galatea which was a popular story represented in art throughout the centuries. It’s a tale of love and jealousy.

I came across this fountain on the last day I was in Paris. It took my breath away as so much did during my 9 day visit but I was already completely in love with Paris at that point. I fell hard within the first few days and it was a never-ending blush on the skin and butterflies in the stomach after that.

I had an interesting conversation on my Twitter earlier today about the differences between Paris and NYC when it comes to initial visual and emotional impact. One of my open-ended conclusions was: “NYC is harder to fall in love with at first sight. Paris sweeps off the feet. NYC woos.” And while I think I need to think about this some more on subsequent returns to Paris, there is some truth there.

Paris does sweep you off of your feet.

—-

—-

View: My photography portfolio, My Gear List, My Travel Blog, On G+,email me, or ask for help.

Apr 10

Paris - A Vieux Paris d’Arcole

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I have been back from Paris for a few days now and I am still in the weird twilight phase of jet-lag where I feel like my mind is suspended between sleep and dreaming yet somehow acutely in tune with all of the experiences I had in Paris. Jet-lag seems to work well for me creatively. Who knew? 

Over the last few days I have been preparing my Paris photography for the gallery event at the end of the month. I will be sharing my experiences and photography over the next few weeks. I hope you will enjoy my musings and views of Paris. 

There is so much to write about and share. I stayed in some truly epic hotels with fascinating histories and views and I got to meet some really amazing people. The beauty of travel is that it is something that is enjoyed multiple times: the first time while living through the experiences, and on subsequent occasions when you are able to share your experiences and fill in the memories with color, light, and emotion.  

For now though, here is a photo from one of the first few days I was in Paris. I actually wrote a little bit about this spot in one of my earlier posts while I was in Paris. I ate lunch there with Hugo from Rendezvous with Paris while talking about the history of the area. While the interior is fascinating on many levels, the exterior is quite beautiful.

The name of the restaurant is A Vieux Paris d’Arcole which was built in 1512 after the completion of the Cathedral of Notre Dame de Paris. It is located at 24 Rue Chanoinesse and it even contains some remnants from Notre Dame’s interior. The diocese sold it in the 1700s when it became a wine bar. As one of the oldest restaurants in Paris, it also enjoys an interesting tourist exception in that the Mayor of Paris allows the external floral decorations which adds to its beautiful medieval character. 


—-

Please check out France Guide on Facebook. If it wasn’t for them, I wouldn’t be here taking photos of Paris and having the experience of a lifetime!

And I also must highly recommend Rendezvous With Paris. They offer passionate tours about specialized subjects as well as tours of different districts of Paris. 

—-

View: My photography portfolio, My Gear List, My Travel Blog, On G+,email me, or ask for help.

Paris - A Vieux Paris d’Arcole

—-

I have been back from Paris for a few days now and I am still in the weird twilight phase of jet-lag where I feel like my mind is suspended between sleep and dreaming yet somehow acutely in tune with all of the experiences I had in Paris. Jet-lag seems to work well for me creatively. Who knew?

Over the last few days I have been preparing my Paris photography for the gallery event at the end of the month. I will be sharing my experiences and photography over the next few weeks. I hope you will enjoy my musings and views of Paris.

There is so much to write about and share. I stayed in some truly epic hotels with fascinating histories and views and I got to meet some really amazing people. The beauty of travel is that it is something that is enjoyed multiple times: the first time while living through the experiences, and on subsequent occasions when you are able to share your experiences and fill in the memories with color, light, and emotion.

For now though, here is a photo from one of the first few days I was in Paris. I actually wrote a little bit about this spot in one of my earlier posts while I was in Paris. I ate lunch there with Hugo from Rendezvous with Paris while talking about the history of the area. While the interior is fascinating on many levels, the exterior is quite beautiful.

The name of the restaurant is A Vieux Paris d’Arcole which was built in 1512 after the completion of the Cathedral of Notre Dame de Paris. It is located at 24 Rue Chanoinesse and it even contains some remnants from Notre Dame’s interior. The diocese sold it in the 1700s when it became a wine bar. As one of the oldest restaurants in Paris, it also enjoys an interesting tourist exception in that the Mayor of Paris allows the external floral decorations which adds to its beautiful medieval character.

—-

Please check out France Guide on Facebook. If it wasn’t for them, I wouldn’t be here taking photos of Paris and having the experience of a lifetime!

And I also must highly recommend Rendezvous With Paris. They offer passionate tours about specialized subjects as well as tours of different districts of Paris.

—-

View: My photography portfolio, My Gear List, My Travel Blog, On G+,email me, or ask for help.

Apr 04

[video]